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Inclusivity : We wish you a Derry Christmas ...

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View Stirlingsays's Profile Stirlingsays Flag Wisbech, England 24 Nov 18 11.54am Send a Private Message to Stirlingsays Holmesdale Online Elite Member Add Stirlingsays as a friend

Originally posted by ASCPFC

Not really, the Presbyterians have always railed at Irish 'immorality'.

Yes really.....I can see we aren't going to agree......on this sensitive issue at least.

Originally posted by ASCPFC

Feminism was genuinely required in Ireland. A woman died in Galway due to the inability of doctors to terminate the foetus. That was very sad.

When you say feminism we are talking about a huge range of takes on it.

More freedom for women to pursue their life choices isn't a bad thing......However a foetus isn't the 'property' of the women, in my view. It is the product of two people, not one and hence I don't believe the area of 'feminism' is a well fitting area for this topic.

Also, I'll just take you up on how you phrased that.....Essentially you say it's sad that the mother died instead of the foetus......Yet she got to live a life, however tragically it ended.....The foetus didn't. The whole situation was tragic.

Also, not being pro choice isn't a black and white issue. I only changed my position on abolition in recent years having been pro choice for most of my adult life......Personally I accept abolition in limited situations now...and I want the time limit reduced.

And yes.....I found the behaviour of those women at that rule changing disgusting.

Originally posted by ASCPFC

It was really not long ago that women were sent to Magdalene laundries for being single mothers. The last ones closed in the nineties.
There was no divorce until the eighties, there was no rape for a spouse. Until the late Seventies married women had to give up working.
Being pro-choice was not really being pro-abortion.

Frankly these are all unrelated to the issue at hand and could and would have been changed regardless of laws on abolition.

The easing of the divorce laws can come under significant criticism......It may be liberating for the individual and indeed sensible.....However holistically it can be pointed at as having been harmful for society......More children growing up without fathers has not had a better affect.

Edited by Stirlingsays (24 Nov 2018 12.00pm)

 

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View Cucking Funt's Profile Cucking Funt Flag Back in the jug agane 24 Nov 18 12.32pm Send a Private Message to Cucking Funt Add Cucking Funt as a friend

Originally posted by ASCPFC

Sounds like you have Irish relations. The London came from the fact that the City of Derry was built with money entirely from the London Corporation. Typically British Crown did not want to pay anything. There was no Derry at all before that - there were no Irish towns as such. The Derry comes from the name of the Gaelic people who lived in that area.
Most of them got better tenancy deals with the new settlement and converted to the English renting system and stayed there. The plantation actually consisted of nearly 50/50 English and Irish.
All inconvenient facts for those wishing to push this agenda.

You could say that, yes. There was, however, a small settlement that was called Derry which, when developed into a city by the conquering English, had the London tabbed on at the front. It was a deliberately provocative and humiliating imposition on the vanquished whatever way you look at it. So much so that it's referred to as Derry by pretty much the whole world except Britain.

 

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View kingdowieonthewall's Profile kingdowieonthewall Flag glorious Goring by sea 24 Nov 18 2.37pm Send a Private Message to kingdowieonthewall Add kingdowieonthewall as a friend

Originally posted by ASCPFC

Sounds like you have Irish relations. The London came from the fact that the City of Derry was built with money entirely from the London Corporation. Typically British Crown did not want to pay anything. There was no Derry at all before that - there were no Irish towns as such. The Derry comes from the name of the Gaelic people who lived in that area.
Most of them got better tenancy deals with the new settlement and converted to the English renting system and stayed there. The plantation actually consisted of nearly 50/50 English and Irish.
All inconvenient facts for those wishing to push this agenda.

try having an irish wife.

they dont know that slavery has been long abolished, when it comes to working on the home.
although you do get a top sunday meal, as there is apparently no such thing as an irish girl that cannot cook.

 


Kids,tired of being bothered by your pesky parents?
Then leave home, get a job & pay your own bills, while you still know everything.

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View ASCPFC's Profile ASCPFC Flag Pro-Cathedral/caravan park 24 Nov 18 5.04pm Send a Private Message to ASCPFC Add ASCPFC as a friend

Originally posted by kingdowieonthewall

try having an irish wife.

they dont know that slavery has been long abolished, when it comes to working on the home.
although you do get a top sunday meal, as there is apparently no such thing as an irish girl that cannot cook.

Why do you think I'm here? Don't let her see that post.

 


Red and Blue Army!

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View ASCPFC's Profile ASCPFC Flag Pro-Cathedral/caravan park 24 Nov 18 5.06pm Send a Private Message to ASCPFC Add ASCPFC as a friend

Originally posted by Cucking Funt

You could say that, yes. There was, however, a small settlement that was called Derry which, when developed into a city by the conquering English, had the London tabbed on at the front. It was a deliberately provocative and humiliating imposition on the vanquished whatever way you look at it. So much so that it's referred to as Derry by pretty much the whole world except Britain.

I could say that, yes. you could say that, yes. Kind of sums up anything about the history of Anglo-Irish relations.

 


Red and Blue Army!

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View kingdowieonthewall's Profile kingdowieonthewall Flag glorious Goring by sea 24 Nov 18 5.15pm Send a Private Message to kingdowieonthewall Add kingdowieonthewall as a friend

Originally posted by ASCPFC

Why do you think I'm here? Don't let her see that post.

that gut busting sunday roast will taste even better after our point at the w***ers place today.

 


Kids,tired of being bothered by your pesky parents?
Then leave home, get a job & pay your own bills, while you still know everything.

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View ASCPFC's Profile ASCPFC Flag Pro-Cathedral/caravan park 24 Nov 18 5.17pm Send a Private Message to ASCPFC Add ASCPFC as a friend

Originally posted by Stirlingsays

Frankly these are all unrelated to the issue at hand and could and would have been changed regardless of laws on abolition.

The easing of the divorce laws can come under significant criticism......It may be liberating for the individual and indeed sensible.....However holistically it can be pointed at as having been harmful for society......More children growing up without fathers has not had a better affect.

Edited by Stirlingsays (24 Nov 2018 12.00pm)

I do understand people with different viewpoints on abortion as it is an emotive issue. The foetus in the case I mentioned was not going to survive - making the death of the woman all the more tragic. The Irish constitution did not necessarily allow for termination even when both were going to die - well as far as the doctors in this case interpreted it. I presume you saw the case - it did not necessarily lead straight to the abortion referendum but it was a big part of it. The name of the woman was something like Sunita Halipinar, in Galway.

As for the other points, they are entirely relevant as Ireland had a recent history of unequal treatment of women. There was a feminist backlash, eventually - probably explaining exuberant celebrations. I didn't watch the celebrations and thought a lot of the campaign and media coverage was bias and over the top. However, it meant so much to many women that I know that I considered it to be their choice on how things went. As it was a constitutional vote I did not have a say - as I am not an Irish citizen. Brexit has not made me go running to change my passport - unlike so many others.
As for an unborn child being a man's property too - I agree - and it is a difficult area to work out exactly what could be done about that in regards to equal rights over an unborn child. What I will say is that there was every indication that men voted in favour of changing the law too - so they did have a say in some way, quite rightly.

 


Red and Blue Army!

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View corkery's Profile corkery Flag Cork City 24 Nov 18 5.20pm Send a Private Message to corkery Add corkery as a friend

Originally posted by ASCPFC

Not really, the Presbyterians have always railed at Irish 'immorality'. Feminism was genuinely required in Ireland. A woman died in Galway due to the inability of doctors to terminate the foetus. That was very sad. It was really not long ago that women were sent to Magdalene laundries for being single mothers. The last ones closed in the nineties.
There was no divorce until the eighties, there was no rape for a spouse. Until the late Seventies married women had to give up working.
Being pro-choice was not really being pro-abortion.


Divorce was in the 90s. There's an episode of Father Ted that aired during the referendum campaign where Ted is betting on a horse called 'Divorce referendum.'

 


We'll never die

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View ASCPFC's Profile ASCPFC Flag Pro-Cathedral/caravan park 24 Nov 18 5.22pm Send a Private Message to ASCPFC Add ASCPFC as a friend

Originally posted by kingdowieonthewall

that gut busting sunday roast will taste even better after our point at the w***ers place today.

I can't stand them either; shame we didn't win. I usually make the roast. I'm having a beer to celebrate the point and the England win in the rugby.

 


Red and Blue Army!

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View ASCPFC's Profile ASCPFC Flag Pro-Cathedral/caravan park 24 Nov 18 5.24pm Send a Private Message to ASCPFC Add ASCPFC as a friend

Originally posted by corkery


Divorce was in the 90s. There's an episode of Father Ted that aired during the referendum campaign where Ted is betting on a horse called 'Divorce referendum.'

My mistake - 1995. Love Father Ted.

 


Red and Blue Army!

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View Cucking Funt's Profile Cucking Funt Flag Back in the jug agane 24 Nov 18 8.00pm Send a Private Message to Cucking Funt Add Cucking Funt as a friend

Originally posted by ASCPFC

I could say that, yes. you could say that, yes. Kind of sums up anything about the history of Anglo-Irish relations.

The history of Anglo-Irish relations could be summarised by one nation's continual brutal suppression of a neighbour that merely wanted its own independence and never even remotely represented a threat to it.

 

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Yellow Card - User has been warned of conduct on the messageboards View pefwin's Profile pefwin Flag Fighting the politics of envy 24 Nov 18 8.15pm Send a Private Message to pefwin Add pefwin as a friend

Originally posted by Cucking Funt

The history of Anglo-Irish relations could be summarised by one nation's continual brutal suppression of a neighbour that merely wanted its own independence and never even remotely represented a threat to it.

St Paddy's day is not that bad albeit forced upon us.

Seriously that could be said for half the countries in the world, and most of Great Britain's history and politics since 1700.

 


"Everything is air-droppable at least once."

"When the going gets tough, the tough call for close air support."

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