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View Qwijibo's Profile Qwijibo Flag Bournemouth 07 Mar 15 7.08pm Send a Private Message to Qwijibo Add Qwijibo as a friend

Quote EaglesEaglesEagles at 06 Mar 2015 2.15pm

Don't listen to music. It's distracting and with a playlist you run to the beat which can be an unnatural way of running in terms of the impact it has on your legs.

See, it's funny you say that because I find it useful! I do about 8.5 miles 2 to 3 times a week. This takes me about 65 minutes, but I can do 10 miles plus (relatively) comfortably. As someone said earlier, so much is in your head, psychology is everything. I find that around 20 minutes in, I need an energy boost mentally, and the right soundtrack works for me, just to raise that belief and take me past the magic half way point.

Having said that, I've also found that spoken radio is good. I need distraction, and a spoken debate allows me to get engrossed. My legs are perfectly capable, it's just my head that persuades myself I'm tired, so if I distract my head, the rest just happens. I discovered this, believe it or not, during the Ian Holloway deadline day debacle of 2013, when we signed about a million players. Listening to 5 Live allowed me a personal best that night. I now find my natural routine is often Monday and Friday nights because of the radio schedule.

 

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View Matts_eagles's Profile Matts_eagles Flag Exeter 09 Mar 15 11.39am Send a Private Message to Matts_eagles Add Matts_eagles as a friend

Thanks for the advice guys its really helpful.
At the moment i'm still struggling to get used to it and my recovery isn't great as i'm trying to diet before my holiday at the same time 10 weeks away.

Haven't being doing much leg work in the gym but maybe I should start that. What you guys said about starting slowly is great advice. I try and go like a bat out of hell at the start and then struggle at the 3-4k point.

My running shoes are quite good as I got them last year from the states in the nike shop and got the assistant to help me decide the best ones but I think i'll take your advice a few months before the run by going to a running shop and getting it measured.

Still got a lot of time until the run - do you think it would be worth in the next few weeks getting to a point there I can get 5k done in a decent time and then start increasing the distance to 6k ect or is it better to keep adding .5 of a kilometre a week on each run?

Haven't ever used a foam roller are they good?

 


Let the games begin

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View Part Time James's Profile Part Time James Flag 09 Mar 15 3.17pm Send a Private Message to Part Time James Add Part Time James as a friend

Quote Matts_eagles at 09 Mar 2015 11.39am

Thanks for the advice guys its really helpful.
At the moment i'm still struggling to get used to it and my recovery isn't great as i'm trying to diet before my holiday at the same time 10 weeks away.

Haven't being doing much leg work in the gym but maybe I should start that. What you guys said about starting slowly is great advice. I try and go like a bat out of hell at the start and then struggle at the 3-4k point.

My running shoes are quite good as I got them last year from the states in the nike shop and got the assistant to help me decide the best ones but I think i'll take your advice a few months before the run by going to a running shop and getting it measured.

Still got a lot of time until the run - do you think it would be worth in the next few weeks getting to a point there I can get 5k done in a decent time and then start increasing the distance to 6k ect or is it better to keep adding .5 of a kilometre a week on each run?

Haven't ever used a foam roller are they good?

I tend to only foam roll for specific injuries and if you have an injury you'll want to head to a physio for the right advice. For minor aches and pains you can refer to YouTube for video guidance but they are far from being a necessity if you're not injured. If you warm up well and stretch a bit afterwards then you'll not need one for just the standard rigours of distance increase.

You definitely don't want to dedicate your time to a 5k PB before upping distance. You'd benefit from some speed work here and there along with hills and intervals, but you also need to gradually up your distances week by week (along with aforementioned drop down weeks). If you start setting 5k personal bests along the way, that's fantastic, but that should only be considered a bonus. A lot of people find their short distance running goes the opposite way when training for longer distance stuff due to an emphasis on building slow twitch muscle fibres over the fast twitch fibres. But everyone is different.


Edited by Part Time James (09 Mar 2015 3.18pm)

 




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View doi209's Profile doi209 Flag Fighting for the weak and innocent... 09 Mar 15 3.28pm Send a Private Message to doi209 Add doi209 as a friend

Quote Part Time James at 06 Mar 2015 1.27pm

Quote Falmouth Eagles at 06 Mar 2015 1.12pm

Well done Matt, good for you!
Best advice is join a running club, there will be lots of experienced runners to help you train for a half and any other distance.
I founded Falmouth Road Runners in 1986, so I talk from experience.

Yes, good advice. I coach at a club. Joining a club was the best thing I did. Helped me through ten half marathons and 2 marathons to date. 3rd one next month.

A couple of tips;
Don't ramp up your longest or your total running volume by more than 15% a week (10% is ideal if you have that luxury).

Every 3-4 weeks schedule a drop down week in to let your body recover a bit. For example you might have:
Week A - 7 miles
Week B - 8 miles
Week C - 9 miles
Week D - 6 miles
Week E - 9.5 miles

You're ready to go when you hit 10 miles in training. The jump to 13 miles on race day won't be too much of a shock. I train up to 15 miles for a HM usually, but only as I've done a load. Of course, this isn't to say you MUST stop when you get to 10. Just that you can be confident that you'll complete it if you can bash out 10 in training.

Make sure you have the right shoes.

Make sure on race day you don't eat or wear anything you've never trained with. It could get messy if you eat something you're not used to if you know what I mean. New shoes could give you blisters, so try to race in gear you've tested in training.

Don't train at one pace. Running 4 miles 3 x a week, then 5 miles 3 x a week etc isn't as good for you as a split that involves a short bit of speed work, some strengthening stuff such as hills, variable paced running and one long run per week. This is something you'll learn a lot about with a running club as suggested above.

Find a training buddy with similar ability. This can be crucial to your motivation during training if you do a handful of training runs with a buddy.

Finally, you might want to read up on tapering prior to the half. Google will give you some good tips there, I won't bore you.

I totally agree with all of the above.
I've bee running for 25 years, have run 10 marathons plus loads of 1/2 and 10 mile races.

Have the confidence to overdistance ( run 15 miles in training for a half marathon ). On the start line, you'll know you can do it.

Enjoy the endorphins.

 

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View Lyons550's Profile Lyons550 Flag Shirley 09 Mar 15 3.53pm Send a Private Message to Lyons550 Add Lyons550 as a friend

I use the Addidas miCoach system and have done for the last 6years. I lost 4 st through running as a result...superb system that will work out programs and training plans for you based on your CURRENT fitness not just some random plan. In addition it accurately measures the distances etc and has a great ecosystem...much better than Nike+

I also listen to talk radio as it allows me to 'zone out' and its only then that you relax and your breathing doesn't become an issue.

I went from running 2 miles in 28mins to 6miles (10km) in 42mins in little over 10months!

 


The Voice of Reason In An Otherwise Mediocre World

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View Y Ddraig Goch's Profile Y Ddraig Goch Flag In The Crowd 09 Mar 15 4.00pm Send a Private Message to Y Ddraig Goch Add Y Ddraig Goch as a friend

Quote Matts_eagles at 09 Mar 2015 11.39am

Thanks for the advice guys its really helpful.
At the moment i'm still struggling to get used to it and my recovery isn't great as i'm trying to diet before my holiday at the same time 10 weeks away.

Haven't being doing much leg work in the gym but maybe I should start that. What you guys said about starting slowly is great advice. I try and go like a bat out of hell at the start and then struggle at the 3-4k point.

My running shoes are quite good as I got them last year from the states in the nike shop and got the assistant to help me decide the best ones but I think i'll take your advice a few months before the run by going to a running shop and getting it measured.

Still got a lot of time until the run - do you think it would be worth in the next few weeks getting to a point there I can get 5k done in a decent time and then start increasing the distance to 6k ect or is it better to keep adding .5 of a kilometre a week on each run?

Haven't ever used a foam roller are they good?

Using a Foam Roller for Myofascial release should really be seen as preventative rather than cure. Lots of new runners suffer from things like ITB Syndrome and foam rolling can help prevent / alleviate that.

You can and should add more than .5k per long run. Look at a mile up to 10 then hover around that for a while. Then you can start playing with the run e.g. Fartlek or finish the last 3 miles fast etc.

On the subject of music, it's a matter of horses for courses but you may want to check the race rules. Lots of races forbid headphones and if you've become dependent on music you may find it harder.

I still think getting your gait checked is worth the time. If you have the wrong sort of trainers you can easily pick up an injury that could bugger up your race.

 


the dignified don't even enter in the game

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View buzby1's Profile buzby1 Flag Devon 09 Mar 15 4.08pm Send a Private Message to buzby1 Add buzby1 as a friend

Running is each to their own. For some clubs work but I like running alone. Most important thing is make sure you get good running shoes that are right for you. Ignore fashion. There's some terrific inner soles that can be moulded to the exact shape of your foot, well worth 45. If you want to run races great, if you don't that's also fine. Start slowly and build up. A good idea to consult a running coach because they can help with your running and also help prevent injuries. (Knees, shin splints, tibial band etc.) Hope you have a great time running and keep doing it for decades. I'm in my sixties and still running.

 

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imbored Flag UK 09 Mar 15 7.03pm

I'm a keen swimmer but in my running days it did do wonders for my cardio. I always found it to be the hardest but most rewarding form of cardio.

 

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View Pete53's Profile Pete53 Flag Hassocks 11 Mar 15 9.28pm Send a Private Message to Pete53 Add Pete53 as a friend

Always aim to finish a training run feeling that you could still run a bit further without any great distress - in other words never run yourself into the ground unless it is an actual event.

Also,if you are ill e.g. have a cold, rest. If you try and run through it you will probably make it worse and take longer to recover.

 

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View PA's Profile PA Flag Bedfordshire 11 Mar 15 11.34pm Send a Private Message to PA Add PA as a friend

I would echo what others have said about Parkrun. Really good if there's one near you. Come and do the Bedford one and you might well find yourself running with AJ and his kids!

Like someone said, a lot of its in the head. Keep going even when you think you're at your limit as you'll be surprised how much you improve with that extra effort.

 

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View Pawson Palace's Profile Pawson Palace Flag Croydon 12 Mar 15 9.07am Send a Private Message to Pawson Palace Add Pawson Palace as a friend

Used to love my running before I discovered powerlifting.

I tried joining Stiders of Croydon but found some of them were total pricks to be honest so packed it in after a few weeks.

No better feeling than running in the rain and I'm working my round to getting back into over the summer ready for winter!

 


Pride of South London
Upper Holmesdale Block P

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