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January 17 2022 12.28am

Is the UK legal system fit for purpose ?

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View Forest Hillbilly's Profile Forest Hillbilly Flag in a hidey-hole 20 Oct 21 6.38am Send a Private Message to Forest Hillbilly Add Forest Hillbilly as a friend

When I say 'system', I am not referring to courtroom activities, as such.
I am just staggered that recent crimes have highlighted consistent failings of the system.
The 'person of interest' monitoring schemes is one such system. It failed to protect the MP that was murdered , and also the guy that stabbed 2 people in Streatham High road. He was being followed by armed police.

Then there was another guy this week out on bail for an attack (pre-trial) who then killed someone.

And the Manchester Arena bombers brother now goes on the run, and has left the UK. What fckwits let this happen ?

My main thrust, is that protection of the public seems to be less of an issue than protection of a suspects Human Rights.

Edited by Forest Hillbilly (20 Oct 2021 7.01am)

 


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View Forest Hillbilly's Profile Forest Hillbilly Flag in a hidey-hole 20 Oct 21 6.49am Send a Private Message to Forest Hillbilly Add Forest Hillbilly as a friend

maybe the wrong forum ? time will tell

 


,.,.,..,

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View Forest Hillbilly's Profile Forest Hillbilly Flag in a hidey-hole 20 Oct 21 3.39pm Send a Private Message to Forest Hillbilly Add Forest Hillbilly as a friend

yep, replying to my own thread,...again

[Link]

Something seems to be awry with the selection process of police officers

"A police force is poised to take legal action over a decision by a misconduct panel not to sack one of its officers after he flashed his warrant card at a woman before sexually harassing her.

In April last year, serving British Transport Police (BTP) officer PC Imran Aftab told a lone woman jogging in Hammersmith, west London, that she was "too curvy to be Asian" and harassed her for her number.

The actions of the officer, who was off-duty at the time of the incident, made the woman feel so uncomfortable that she texted "help me" to a friend.

The officer sent the woman six messages, leading to her lodging a complaint with the Independent Office for Police Conduct.

In May, a misconduct panel found PC Aftab guilty of gross misconduct for abusing his position for a sexual purpose, giving him a final written warning.

BTP are now challenging the decision, as they believe the officer should have been dismissed over his conduct." (ITV.com)

 


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View cryrst's Profile cryrst Flag Chatham 20 Oct 21 5.47pm Send a Private Message to cryrst Add cryrst as a friend

Originally posted by Forest Hillbilly

yep, replying to my own thread,...again

[Link]

Something seems to be awry with the selection process of police officers

"A police force is poised to take legal action over a decision by a misconduct panel not to sack one of its officers after he flashed his warrant card at a woman before sexually harassing her.

In April last year, serving British Transport Police (BTP) officer PC Imran Aftab told a lone woman jogging in Hammersmith, west London, that she was "too curvy to be Asian" and harassed her for her number.

The actions of the officer, who was off-duty at the time of the incident, made the woman feel so uncomfortable that she texted "help me" to a friend.

The officer sent the woman six messages, leading to her lodging a complaint with the Independent Office for Police Conduct.

In May, a misconduct panel found PC Aftab guilty of gross misconduct for abusing his position for a sexual purpose, giving him a final written warning.

BTP are now challenging the decision, as they believe the officer should have been dismissed over his conduct." (ITV.com)


He should be sacked. End of

 

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View The Dolphin's Profile The Dolphin Flag 21 Oct 21 10.49am Send a Private Message to The Dolphin Add The Dolphin as a friend

Agreed.
I hear though that this process can take years which is wrong on every level.

 

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View Badger11's Profile Badger11 Flag Beckenham 21 Oct 21 10.58am Send a Private Message to Badger11 Add Badger11 as a friend

Originally posted by The Dolphin

Agreed.
I hear though that this process can take years which is wrong on every level.

Exactly you hit a copper you are charged in a couple of days. A copper hits you......

I don't see why it takes months if not years.

1. Is there evidence to back up claims of police brutality e.g. video if yes what else to investigate charge the copper. If no clear the copper and close the case.

Edited by Badger11 (21 Oct 2021 11.00am)

 


One more point

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View MrRobbo's Profile MrRobbo Flag Purley 21 Oct 21 12.50pm Send a Private Message to MrRobbo Add MrRobbo as a friend

Originally posted by Forest Hillbilly

When I say 'system', I am not referring to courtroom activities, as such.
I am just staggered that recent crimes have highlighted consistent failings of the system.
The 'person of interest' monitoring schemes is one such system. It failed to protect the MP that was murdered , and also the guy that stabbed 2 people in Streatham High road. He was being followed by armed police.

Then there was another guy this week out on bail for an attack (pre-trial) who then killed someone.

And the Manchester Arena bombers brother now goes on the run, and has left the UK. What fckwits let this happen ?

My main thrust, is that protection of the public seems to be less of an issue than protection of a suspects Human Rights.

Edited by Forest Hillbilly (20 Oct 2021 7.01am)


Its an interesting one, as it does seam that whenever something like this happens, they were often known to the police etc. I can only assume there are levels of suspicion? (from looking at 1 ISIS video all the way through to other gateways crimes)

Now I get that you cant follow everyone, and people still deserve freedom. But I guess what you are getting at is what's the point of having watchlists etc if they are still able to commit crimes and kill people.

What would be interesting to know is the ratio of watchlist ppl that commit crimes to foiled attempts.

I can only assume (hope) that for the ones we hear about there are hundreds that get prevented.


 

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