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Monkeypox

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Yellow Card - User has been warned of conduct on the messageboards View Mapletree's Profile Mapletree Flag Croydon 26 May 22 8.48am Send a Private Message to Mapletree Add Mapletree as a friend

Originally posted by Matov


I fully agree. But there is a lot of political capital now invested in the 'threat' of communicable diseases which a lot of scientists do not see as that much of a major problem. Yes Covid was a novel virus and we are all living with the consequences but in terms of how and who it killed, then nothing that much out of the ordinary, acting as viruses are meant in terms of their evolutionary purpose. Now the 'Spanish' flu, that was a whole different ball game altogether but Covid 19, whilst nasty, was never seen as a major threat.

Is 15m excess deaths (13%) - after a world lockdown and mass vaccination programme - really nothing out of the ordinary?

It appears to me it was indeed seen as a major threat, or do countries just enjoy locking people away?

Edited by Mapletree (26 May 2022 8.50am)

 

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View Matov's Profile Matov Online Flag 26 May 22 9.27am Send a Private Message to Matov Add Matov as a friend

Originally posted by Mapletree

Is 15m excess deaths (13%) - after a world lockdown and mass vaccination programme - really nothing out of the ordinary?

It appears to me it was indeed seen as a major threat, or do countries just enjoy locking people away?

Edited by Mapletree (26 May 2022 8.50am)

As I said, it was/is a novel virus, now mutating into just one of the myriad of common cold viruses. And yes, it had an impact. But those poor people who died of it were, on the whole, already ill.

I am certainly not trying to downplay the individual tragedy but in a much colder way of looking at things, viruses are part of the background noise of humanity having an evolutionary purpose in terms of impacting on those who are older/weaker. Just the way of the world.

The Spanish Flu was different, as is influenza generally, in that it mutates far quicker and has the potential to kill outside of the usual groups. Covid 19 was/is horrible, and measures had to be taken (although the debate is still to be had on that when everything is known) but the reality is that in any society in which resources have to be directed, does it really rank with the wider damage of conditions such as cancer and so on which impacts on a far wider range of the population?

This is where I believe the real debate/discussion lays and why I am led to understand that this hype around 'Monkey Pox' is part of that wider issue.

Edited by Matov (26 May 2022 9.28am)

 


"The Party told you to reject the evidence of your eyes and ears. It was their final, most essential command." - 1984 - George Orwell.

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View PalazioVecchio's Profile PalazioVecchio Flag south pole 26 May 22 10.54am Send a Private Message to PalazioVecchio Add PalazioVecchio as a friend

what will be the financial ramifications of this disease ? especially on household savings ?

MonkeyPox MoneyBox

 


7 points from Manchester last season

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Yellow Card - User has been warned of conduct on the messageboards View W12's Profile W12 Online 26 May 22 11.44am Send a Private Message to W12 Add W12 as a friend

Originally posted by PalazioVecchio

what will be the financial ramifications of this disease ? especially on household savings ?

MonkeyPox MoneyBox

It's a silent "K"

 

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View cryrst's Profile cryrst Flag The garden of England 26 May 22 12.36pm Send a Private Message to cryrst Add cryrst as a friend

Originally posted by Matov

As I said, it was/is a novel virus, now mutating into just one of the myriad of common cold viruses. And yes, it had an impact. But those poor people who died of it were, on the whole, already ill.

I am certainly not trying to downplay the individual tragedy but in a much colder way of looking at things, viruses are part of the background noise of humanity having an evolutionary purpose in terms of impacting on those who are older/weaker. Just the way of the world.

The Spanish Flu was different, as is influenza generally, in that it mutates far quicker and has the potential to kill outside of the usual groups. Covid 19 was/is horrible, and measures had to be taken (although the debate is still to be had on that when everything is known) but the reality is that in any society in which resources have to be directed, does it really rank with the wider damage of conditions such as cancer and so on which impacts on a far wider range of the population?

This is where I believe the real debate/discussion lays and why I am led to understand that this hype around 'Monkey Pox' is part of that wider issue.

Edited by Matov (26 May 2022 9.28am)

They may have been ill but for most death wasnt imminent. Weve all got it coming but Im sure many would still be with us.

 

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Yellow Card - User has been warned of conduct on the messageboards View W12's Profile W12 Online 26 May 22 2.24pm Send a Private Message to W12 Add W12 as a friend

Originally posted by cryrst

They may have been ill but for most death wasnt imminent. Weve all got it coming but Im sure many would still be with us.

We have no way of knowing that but we should do. With all the money spent (and we are talking hundreds of billions) why could we not have a detailed assessment of every death to reveal the true danger. We are supposed to have had some 178,000 deaths in the UK over two years from a population of some 68,000,000 but we know these were deaths "within 28 days of a positive test" so the actual number will be significantly lower. Even if you take this figure as realistic COVID deaths we are still looking at mortality of something in the region of 0.1 percent per year which is a normal bad flu year. The argument is that it would have been worse without lockdowns and other measures but we know now that it's not the case due to places like Florida and Sweden where there were very limited measures put in place. It made no significant difference.

Also note that excess mortality was higher in 2021 than 2020 when we didn't have the vaccine. You don't have to be any kind of expert to work this out.


 

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