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June 24 2024 10.28am

Brilliant Times Article

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View taylors lovechild's Profile taylors lovechild Online Flag 18 May 24 3.27pm Send a Private Message to taylors lovechild Add taylors lovechild as a friend

In my dreams, Glasner gets everyone together in a Toby Carvery and over some roasties and a couple of pints of lager gives an emotional speech asking the squad to give him one season and see where it takes them. Everyone cheers. We win the league, the FA Cup and beat Brighton so badly half their squad retire with embarrassment.

 

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View beak's Profile beak Flag croydon 18 May 24 4.19pm Send a Private Message to beak Add beak as a friend

Originally posted by kingdowieonthewall

personally, I think theyll let Olise go for the right price 60 mill plus and try to hang onto the rest.
try anyway..
However if Glasner is actually backed & we keep em all plus strengthen, comfortable top 8 and a tilt and 1 of the cups.

Really, when Rice went to Arsenal for £105 million. He is useless in comparison.

 

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View thetopgeezer's Profile thetopgeezer Flag Streatham Hill 18 May 24 7.17pm Send a Private Message to thetopgeezer Add thetopgeezer as a friend

Sorry guys. I get one free hit in The Times but if course that might not apply to everyone


Today's Times

The original Crystal Palace was built to house treasures. As the setting for the Great Exhibition of 1851, Joseph Paxton’s magnificent structure displayed brooches and brocades, daguerreotypes and telescopes, folding pianos and Greek statues, an embroidered howdah on a stuffed elephant and two of the world’s finest diamonds, the Koh-i-Noor and the Daria-i-Noor. And so there is a faint symmetry to the fact that the football club who take their name from that building are, at this moment, the repository of two of the Premier League’s sparkling jewels.

Eberechi Eze and Michael Olise are not only two of the best players in English football, but also two of the most joyful to watch. They have both had brilliant seasons: Olise, incredibly, has averaged 1.14 goals plus assists per 90 minutes, which ranks third behind Erling Haaland and Cole Palmer among all players. Eze has completed more dribbles than anyone except Mohammed Kudus, Jérémy Doku and Bruno Guimarães, and scored more goals than each of those three players.

When they play separately, their individual qualities are clear: Eze’s strong, glidingly balanced, vertical dribbling; Olise’s flicked passes and whippy shots around defenders. When they play together, there is a beautiful collusion, an instinctive harmony of tempo and spirit, two street artists painting the pitch with their patterns.


Club football in 2024 is a place of fierce and stripping winds, unrelenting in their rapacity, unchanging in their direction. Already, the stealthy breeze of a long summer is stirring, and the whispers carried on the air are that Eze will be a target for Manchester City and Tottenham Hotspur, while Olise is likely to be coveted by Arsenal, Manchester United, Aston Villa and perhaps others besides. Palace have let it be known that offers for Eze and Olise, both of whom signed new contracts this season, will have to start at £60million.

It feels like a film we have all seen before. Very likely, over the summer, two of the big clubs will get two of the league’s brightest talents, Eze and Olise will get moves no one could begrudge them, and Palace will get a £140million return on players who cost them less than £30million combined. In a way, everyone wins. And yet, I find myself hoping fervently that Palace hang on to both of their star playmakers for another season at least.


In recent years a kind of mercantile cleverness has become the admired paradigm for clubs of Palace’s stature. The way that the likes of Brighton & Hove Albion and Brentford, Porto and Borussia Dortmund, scour the four corners of the sport, identify young talent, give it a platform, then profit from the thirst of a bigger club and regenerate has come to epitomise what it means to be a well-run club in an era of financial stratification.

Eze, left, and Olise are the sort of players that Palace will need if they are to mount a serious challenge for the European places
Eze, left, and Olise are the sort of players that Palace will need if they are to mount a serious challenge for the European places

Thrift, resilience and sensible husbandry are of course laudable qualities. But this strategy, however ingeniously executed, contains a baked-in defeatism, a polite acceptance of one’s place in the food chain. And much as we may admire, for example, the shrewdness that allowed Brighton to extract £150million for Moisés Caicedo and Alexis Mac Allister, their departures have significantly weakened a team who finished sixth last season.

Palace now find themselves in a similar spot. Since Oliver Glasner took charge of his first match, against Burnley on February 24, they have the fourth-best points per game in the league. Since Olise returned from injury on April 6 and he and Eze have been playing in tandem under the new manager, only two teams, Manchester City and Chelsea, have scored more goals. It’s a limited sample, but so far, the evidence suggests that under Glasner, when Eze and Olise play together, Palace are one of the best teams in the league. Why shouldn’t they aspire to finish fourth next season?

The early evidence suggests that Glasner is a man who can allow Palace to aim higher
The early evidence suggests that Glasner is a man who can allow Palace to aim higher

Already, the club have shown backbone by fending off an approach from Bayern Munich for Glasner. They don’t need to sell Eze or Olise. And there should be a little ripple of realisation running through this team, that what they could achieve by staying together might be more special than the fates that await them if they are sundered.

Something similar was felt at Bayer Leverkusen towards the end of last season. The club could easily have sold Jeremie Frimpong, Edmond Tapsoba or Florian Wirtz last summer, but countenanced only one first-team departure, Moussa Diaby to Aston Villa. Now those players are writing the greatest story of their careers.

Eze and Olise are more than worthy of the interest from the Premier League’s giants. To challenge themselves in that more rarefied air would be an understandable ambition. But those moves are also laced with risk. Let’s say, for example, that City firm up their interest in Eze. The opportunity to work with Pep Guardiola would be beguiling. And yet, the past four players that City have signed from Premier League clubs are Mateo Kovacic, Matheus Nunes, Kalvin Phillips and Jack Grealish.

Phillips’s ill-fated move to City serves as a warning for players linked with moves to the big sides
Phillips’s ill-fated move to City serves as a warning for players linked with moves to the big sides.

Kovacic has found his niche, but Phillips’s move was a disaster, Nunes has barely played this season and though Grealish has been successful, he has become a different, more peripheral, less spellbinding player than he was at Villa. Olise, meanwhile, would be competing for Bukayo Saka’s spot at Arsenal, and stepping into the one shadowed by the spectre of Jadon Sancho at United.

The Premier League also simply feels like a more interesting place with Eze and Olise at Palace. The spectacle is richer when the talent is more evenly spread, and suffers when it pools and piles up at the wealthiest end of the spectrum. This is part of what makes the NFL so popular. The teams with the best quarterbacks and those with the best receivers are not the same. The 15th or 20th-best teams contain some of the league’s marquee players. The radiance of stars is best appreciated when they are speckled spaciously across the sky, rather than clustered together in constellations of cluttered density.

There is also this: of all the present Premier League teams, Palace in particular have a sense of being rooted in their own community, something distinct which reflects something real. Eze and Olise were both born in London; so were Tyrick Mitchell and Jesurun Rak-Sakyi; Marc Guéhi moved there when he was one. Eze and Olise are of Nigerian and Nigerian-Algerian descent respectively; Mitchell and Rak-Sakyi have Jamaican and Ghanaian heritage; Guéhi’s parents moved from Côte d’Ivoire. Their club is embedded in a borough, Croydon, where in the 2021 census 22.6 per cent of residents identified as Black, Black British, Caribbean or African.

A football team does not have to echo the demographics of its location in this way — it doesn’t matter that Wolverhampton doesn’t have a large Portuguese-speaking community, or that Brentford’s Scandinavian-ness is an identity drawn by the club, not drawn from its surroundings — but it is nice, and meaningful, that one Premier League team does.


For now, while it lasts, Olise and Eze’s presence in this particular corner of south London, like the trusses that once supported Joseph Paxton’s Crystal Palace, upholds something that is both magical and ethereal, glittering with possibility, but also firmly anchored in the ground on which it stands.

 

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View DenTyler's Profile DenTyler Flag Sidcup 18 May 24 9.04pm Send a Private Message to DenTyler Add DenTyler as a friend

I am convinced that we wil keep this team together. Possibly with the exception of Marc Guéhi who looks like he wants out.

Glasnor is building something special and I think he would have got assurances that he would keep the team for at least next year.
Other than AWB palace have not been a selling team, with what has happened in Germany there is also a hint that anything is possible (no I’m not suggesting we will win the league). Nobody is going to want to play us if we keep the team together.
Look at how close Eze and Olise are. I think they will stay.

 

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View doombear's Profile doombear Flag Too far from Selhurst Park 18 May 24 10.37pm Send a Private Message to doombear Add doombear as a friend

We simply don't know what terms were attached to the renewed contracts signed last Summer. If there are clauses that allow the two players to speak to clubs under certain circumstances then there is little Palace can do if those circumstances arise. If, as has been reported, Palace have really said that the bidding for each of the two players has to start at £60m there may well be such clauses. We can hope that is not the case and that they can both be persuaded to give us another year to see what can be achieved.

 

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View AERO's Profile AERO Flag 18 May 24 10.45pm Send a Private Message to AERO Add AERO as a friend

If we sell Guehi& Olaise who i think will both go .we will have £120 mil approx Glasner will already have decent replacements lined up at half the price

 

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View PJEagle's Profile PJEagle Flag London 19 May 24 11.55am Send a Private Message to PJEagle Add PJEagle as a friend

Originally posted by thetopgeezer

Sorry guys. I get one free hit in The Times but if course that might not apply to everyone


Today's Times

The original Crystal Palace was built to house treasures. As the setting for the Great Exhibition of 1851, Joseph Paxton’s magnificent structure displayed brooches and brocades, daguerreotypes and telescopes, folding pianos and Greek statues, an embroidered howdah on a stuffed elephant and two of the world’s finest diamonds, the Koh-i-Noor and the Daria-i-Noor. And so there is a faint symmetry to the fact that the football club who take their name from that building are, at this moment, the repository of two of the Premier League’s sparkling jewels.

Eberechi Eze and Michael Olise are not only two of the best players in English football, but also two of the most joyful to watch. They have both had brilliant seasons: Olise, incredibly, has averaged 1.14 goals plus assists per 90 minutes, which ranks third behind Erling Haaland and Cole Palmer among all players. Eze has completed more dribbles than anyone except Mohammed Kudus, Jérémy Doku and Bruno Guimarães, and scored more goals than each of those three players.

When they play separately, their individual qualities are clear: Eze’s strong, glidingly balanced, vertical dribbling; Olise’s flicked passes and whippy shots around defenders. When they play together, there is a beautiful collusion, an instinctive harmony of tempo and spirit, two street artists painting the pitch with their patterns.


Club football in 2024 is a place of fierce and stripping winds, unrelenting in their rapacity, unchanging in their direction. Already, the stealthy breeze of a long summer is stirring, and the whispers carried on the air are that Eze will be a target for Manchester City and Tottenham Hotspur, while Olise is likely to be coveted by Arsenal, Manchester United, Aston Villa and perhaps others besides. Palace have let it be known that offers for Eze and Olise, both of whom signed new contracts this season, will have to start at £60million.

It feels like a film we have all seen before. Very likely, over the summer, two of the big clubs will get two of the league’s brightest talents, Eze and Olise will get moves no one could begrudge them, and Palace will get a £140million return on players who cost them less than £30million combined. In a way, everyone wins. And yet, I find myself hoping fervently that Palace hang on to both of their star playmakers for another season at least.


In recent years a kind of mercantile cleverness has become the admired paradigm for clubs of Palace’s stature. The way that the likes of Brighton & Hove Albion and Brentford, Porto and Borussia Dortmund, scour the four corners of the sport, identify young talent, give it a platform, then profit from the thirst of a bigger club and regenerate has come to epitomise what it means to be a well-run club in an era of financial stratification.

Eze, left, and Olise are the sort of players that Palace will need if they are to mount a serious challenge for the European places
Eze, left, and Olise are the sort of players that Palace will need if they are to mount a serious challenge for the European places

Thrift, resilience and sensible husbandry are of course laudable qualities. But this strategy, however ingeniously executed, contains a baked-in defeatism, a polite acceptance of one’s place in the food chain. And much as we may admire, for example, the shrewdness that allowed Brighton to extract £150million for Moisés Caicedo and Alexis Mac Allister, their departures have significantly weakened a team who finished sixth last season.

Palace now find themselves in a similar spot. Since Oliver Glasner took charge of his first match, against Burnley on February 24, they have the fourth-best points per game in the league. Since Olise returned from injury on April 6 and he and Eze have been playing in tandem under the new manager, only two teams, Manchester City and Chelsea, have scored more goals. It’s a limited sample, but so far, the evidence suggests that under Glasner, when Eze and Olise play together, Palace are one of the best teams in the league. Why shouldn’t they aspire to finish fourth next season?

The early evidence suggests that Glasner is a man who can allow Palace to aim higher
The early evidence suggests that Glasner is a man who can allow Palace to aim higher

Already, the club have shown backbone by fending off an approach from Bayern Munich for Glasner. They don’t need to sell Eze or Olise. And there should be a little ripple of realisation running through this team, that what they could achieve by staying together might be more special than the fates that await them if they are sundered.

Something similar was felt at Bayer Leverkusen towards the end of last season. The club could easily have sold Jeremie Frimpong, Edmond Tapsoba or Florian Wirtz last summer, but countenanced only one first-team departure, Moussa Diaby to Aston Villa. Now those players are writing the greatest story of their careers.

Eze and Olise are more than worthy of the interest from the Premier League’s giants. To challenge themselves in that more rarefied air would be an understandable ambition. But those moves are also laced with risk. Let’s say, for example, that City firm up their interest in Eze. The opportunity to work with Pep Guardiola would be beguiling. And yet, the past four players that City have signed from Premier League clubs are Mateo Kovacic, Matheus Nunes, Kalvin Phillips and Jack Grealish.

Phillips’s ill-fated move to City serves as a warning for players linked with moves to the big sides
Phillips’s ill-fated move to City serves as a warning for players linked with moves to the big sides.

Kovacic has found his niche, but Phillips’s move was a disaster, Nunes has barely played this season and though Grealish has been successful, he has become a different, more peripheral, less spellbinding player than he was at Villa. Olise, meanwhile, would be competing for Bukayo Saka’s spot at Arsenal, and stepping into the one shadowed by the spectre of Jadon Sancho at United.

The Premier League also simply feels like a more interesting place with Eze and Olise at Palace. The spectacle is richer when the talent is more evenly spread, and suffers when it pools and piles up at the wealthiest end of the spectrum. This is part of what makes the NFL so popular. The teams with the best quarterbacks and those with the best receivers are not the same. The 15th or 20th-best teams contain some of the league’s marquee players. The radiance of stars is best appreciated when they are speckled spaciously across the sky, rather than clustered together in constellations of cluttered density.

There is also this: of all the present Premier League teams, Palace in particular have a sense of being rooted in their own community, something distinct which reflects something real. Eze and Olise were both born in London; so were Tyrick Mitchell and Jesurun Rak-Sakyi; Marc Guéhi moved there when he was one. Eze and Olise are of Nigerian and Nigerian-Algerian descent respectively; Mitchell and Rak-Sakyi have Jamaican and Ghanaian heritage; Guéhi’s parents moved from Côte d’Ivoire. Their club is embedded in a borough, Croydon, where in the 2021 census 22.6 per cent of residents identified as Black, Black British, Caribbean or African.

A football team does not have to echo the demographics of its location in this way — it doesn’t matter that Wolverhampton doesn’t have a large Portuguese-speaking community, or that Brentford’s Scandinavian-ness is an identity drawn by the club, not drawn from its surroundings — but it is nice, and meaningful, that one Premier League team does.


For now, while it lasts, Olise and Eze’s presence in this particular corner of south London, like the trusses that once supported Joseph Paxton’s Crystal Palace, upholds something that is both magical and ethereal, glittering with possibility, but also firmly anchored in the ground on which it stands.

This is a top post, the post of tge season , well done geezer!

 

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View Pierre's Profile Pierre Flag Purley 19 May 24 11.59am Send a Private Message to Pierre Add Pierre as a friend


If it is true that all the players are enjoying the latter part of the season as much as we all are under Glasner.
There must be some compelling reasons and compulsion as to why they wouldn't want the majority to stay next season and give it a real go from the start.
I agree it may be without Guehi but with Lerma and Doucoure back, a couple of signings to strengthen the squad we would be a handful for most teams in the Premiership so long as we were able to keep everyone fit!

 

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View Uphill's Profile Uphill Flag Bedford 19 May 24 12.02pm Send a Private Message to Uphill Add Uphill as a friend

It would have been polite to credit the writer of this article in the Times on Saturday.

It was James Gheerbrant.

He has done his research, and although it might be wishful thinking, his summary of the Palace situation is in harmony with what most Palace fans hope for.

As usual, only time will tell .....

 


Man and boy Palace since my first game in 1948 sitting on my dad's shoulders

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View thetopgeezer's Profile thetopgeezer Flag Streatham Hill 19 May 24 12.36pm Send a Private Message to thetopgeezer Add thetopgeezer as a friend

You're right Uphill thank you for doing that. I don't think we have any intention of selling either player but they may well have their heads turned by agents and money. It's such a short career I think you probably need to sieze your moment when it comes.

That said I cannot see a glaring moment for either player at City or Arsenal and I don't think Chelsea or Spurs offer the right path.

Man U need to start again so I'd go nowhere near that.

Also we are capable with a couple more players of doing a Villa. Playing for fun at a place you like and making Europe isn't a bad story.

 

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View Elwissthebest's Profile Elwissthebest Flag Marlborough 19 May 24 7.06pm Send a Private Message to Elwissthebest Add Elwissthebest as a friend

Yes, he's a talented writer. He wrote another good piece about the day Leverkusen was crowned champions of the Bundesliga. I had the good fortune to be present at the Bay Arena that day and he caught the atmosphere perfectly, if I may say so.

But I wonder whether he was born when Palace finished third in the top flight under Steve Coppell in the Wright/Bright era? And the words 'Food Chain' capture the essence of the problem. Of course Olise and Eze will move on. That's just the law of the economic jungle. In similar fashion, further down the food chain, Palace plundered Q.P.R. via Millwall, and Reading...

 

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View Palace Old Geezer's Profile Palace Old Geezer Flag Midhurst 19 May 24 8.19pm Send a Private Message to Palace Old Geezer Add Palace Old Geezer as a friend

Thanks for reproducing the Times article Top geezer. The writer, Gheerbrant, clearly sees things like most of us.

Let's hope we can hang on to our treasures. Their brand of cage football is unique and it belongs here.

 


Dad and I watched games standing on the muddy slope of the Holmesdale Road end. He cheered and I rattled.

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