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Recommend A Good Book

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View Palace Old Geezer's Profile Palace Old Geezer Flag Midhurst 02 Sep 21 1.07pm Send a Private Message to Palace Old Geezer Add Palace Old Geezer as a friend

I need a new book from the library. Rather than stick with the old favourites - James Patterson rarely disappoints and Lee Child's Jack Reacher stories are fine, but a bit samey - I thought I'd try something new.

Anyone care to recommend a book you've enjoyed recently? There are so many new authors now it all gets a tad confusing. Bit like choosing a Farrow and Ball paint I imagine.

I've read Osman's Thursday Murder Club and I chuckled in odd places, but thought it was lightweight. Currently reading Once Upon A Time In Hollywood which is same as the film except Tarantino adds little anecdotes about his favourite films, directors and actors. A fun read.

To start things off, I thoroughly recommend I Am Pilgrim by Terry Hayes. Suggested to me by a friend who is a Palace Ambassador and it's topical (although published in 2013), as it tells of a vaccine proof virus created by a Saudi in the aftermath of 9/11. Also remarkable because it's Hayes' first novel. Thrilling.

So, use this thread as a place to recommend or search for good books. Over to you and I look forward to selecting a new and interesting title.

 


Dad and I watched games standing on the muddy slope of the Holmesdale Road end. He cheered and I rattled.

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View eagleman13's Profile eagleman13 Flag On The Road To Hell & Alicante 02 Sep 21 1.48pm Send a Private Message to eagleman13 Holmesdale Online Elite Member Add eagleman13 as a friend

Anything by Douglas Reeman, if you like WW2/RN. Also 'SAM 7' by Richard Cox. SAM being Surface to Air Missile.

 


This operation, will make the 'Charge Of The Light Brigade' seem like a simple military exercise.

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View ASCPFC's Profile ASCPFC Flag Pro-Cathedral/caravan park 02 Sep 21 2.08pm Send a Private Message to ASCPFC Add ASCPFC as a friend

Foucault's Pendulum by Umberto Eco really blew me away when I read it. Just to let you know, it's years before Dan Brown but has so much more. Almost the history of every Christian sect and philosophy in the novel (it's not even ridiculously long).

I then read all of his others. Probably best to start with The Name of the Rose (close to the film) by Eco and see what you think. Kind of historical, massively researched fiction.
Just a heads up - absolutely nothing like the sh1t that is Game of Thrones etc. Hugely intelligent guy. Recently died.
Sometimes it's nice to go back to the classics like Hemmingway too.
Another favourite of mine is Dostoyevsky Crime and Punishment. Read it and you know the murderer in every whodunnit - book or TV. I'm not sure I even recommend it. I first read it at 13 at school for a random book report - just to p1ss my teachers off. Just thought I'd get the longest Russian novel that was in the school library (War and Peace wasn't there - don't bother with that).
Yes, I am the life and soul of the party.

Edited by ASCPFC (02 Sep 2021 2.09pm)

 


Red and Blue Army!

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Yellow Card - User has been warned of conduct on the messageboards View ex hibitionist's Profile ex hibitionist Online Flag Hastings 02 Sep 21 2.48pm Send a Private Message to ex hibitionist Add ex hibitionist as a friend

it's fact rather than fiction but 'The Science Delusion' by Rupert Sheldrake is much more interesting than 'the God Delusion' by Dawkins. Been reading science for a few years now and Fred Hoyle's 'Origins of the Universe' is great - he was the main player in working out when and where heavier elements, like metals, were formed in the early universe - he knew his physics and chemistry as well or better than anyone and didn't believe organic molecules could just evolve out of basic inorganic chemistry, the probability would be ridiculously small, so the amino acid soup idea was a non-starter for him, he reckoned viral or bacterial material from outer space was the trigger for life on earth, and to believe life could simply evolve on this planet was as geocentric as believing our planet was the centre of the solar system. Rupert Sheldrake recommends a novel by Hoyle called the 'The Black Cloud' which is about a nebulous cosmic entity having a consciousness - sound rather good and rather out there so I may check it out myself.

 

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View ASCPFC's Profile ASCPFC Flag Pro-Cathedral/caravan park 02 Sep 21 2.52pm Send a Private Message to ASCPFC Add ASCPFC as a friend

Originally posted by ex hibitionist

it's fact rather than fiction but 'The Science Delusion' by Rupert Sheldrake is much more interesting than 'the God Delusion' by Dawkins. Been reading science for a few years now and Fred Hoyle's 'Origins of the Universe' is great - he was the main player in working out when and where heavier elements, like metals, were formed in the early universe - he knew his physics and chemistry as well or better than anyone and didn't believe organic molecules could just evolve out of basic inorganic chemistry, the probability would be ridiculously small, so the amino acid soup idea was a non-starter for him, he reckoned viral or bacterial material from outer space was the trigger for life on earth, and to believe life could simply evolve on this planet was as geocentric as believing our planet was the centre of the solar system. Rupert Sheldrake recommends a novel by Hoyle called the 'The Black Cloud' which is about a nebulous cosmic entity having a consciousness - sound rather good and rather out there so I may check it out myself.

Literally a Star Trek episode.

 


Red and Blue Army!

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Yellow Card - User has been warned of conduct on the messageboards View Behind Enemy Lines's Profile Behind Enemy Lines Flag Sussex 02 Sep 21 3.14pm Send a Private Message to Behind Enemy Lines Add Behind Enemy Lines as a friend

Only available in electronic format - but therefore cheaper than a book version - G D Harrison has a couple of shorter books out there. Past Imperfect has picked up some 5 star reviews. Mariner Twenty is for the sci-if readers amongst us.

 


hats off to palace, they were always gonna be louder, and hate to say it but they were impressive ALL bouncing and singing.

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Yellow Card - User has been warned of conduct on the messageboards View ex hibitionist's Profile ex hibitionist Online Flag Hastings 02 Sep 21 3.28pm Send a Private Message to ex hibitionist Add ex hibitionist as a friend

they have to get their ideas from somewhere and that's as good a place as any. Just ordered it with postage for 3.20 - result! It does sound a bit star trek but the issue is still relevant to A.I. - there is no agreement in the scientific community as to what consciousness is and if it could held in a computer or generated by one. If a computer's OK then why not a cloud or a giant green cube?

 

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View Badger11's Profile Badger11 Flag Beckenham 02 Sep 21 3.39pm Send a Private Message to Badger11 Add Badger11 as a friend

Originally posted by ASCPFC

Foucault's Pendulum by Umberto Eco really blew me away when I read it. Just to let you know, it's years before Dan Brown but has so much more. Almost the history of every Christian sect and philosophy in the novel (it's not even ridiculously long).

I then read all of his others. Probably best to start with The Name of the Rose (close to the film) by Eco and see what you think. Kind of historical, massively researched fiction.
Just a heads up - absolutely nothing like the sh1t that is Game of Thrones etc. Hugely intelligent guy. Recently died.
Sometimes it's nice to go back to the classics like Hemmingway too.
Another favourite of mine is Dostoyevsky Crime and Punishment. Read it and you know the murderer in every whodunnit - book or TV. I'm not sure I even recommend it. I first read it at 13 at school for a random book report - just to p1ss my teachers off. Just thought I'd get the longest Russian novel that was in the school library (War and Peace wasn't there - don't bother with that).
Yes, I am the life and soul of the party.

Edited by ASCPFC (02 Sep 2021 2.09pm)

Both Excellent books.

Some I have read this year.

- Where the crawdads sing (deep south shades of to kill a mockingbird)
- Shadow of the wind (there are 4 in the series, gothic Barcelona)
- Shardlake series by C J Samson medieval murder mysteries excellent.
- The Midnight Library - Girl kills herself and finds she is in purgatory.
- Wolf Hall Trilogy
- Seven Years in Tibet much better than the movie.
- My brilliant friend - Elena Ferrante life in Naples
- Citizen Clem a biography of Clement Attlee
- A fine balance - Life in India during the emergency.
- Nathaniel's Nutmeg - true story of how we lost Indonesia and gained NY.


 


One more point

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View Teddy Eagle's Profile Teddy Eagle Online Flag 02 Sep 21 3.56pm Send a Private Message to Teddy Eagle Add Teddy Eagle as a friend


Since you like crime stories - some maybe lesser known Scottish authors:

Craig Robertson
Craig Russell
T. F. Muir
Caro Ramsay
Tony Black
Alan Parks
Denzil Meyrick
Alex Gray

 

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View grumpymort's Profile grumpymort Flag US/Thailand/UK 02 Sep 21 4.04pm Send a Private Message to grumpymort Add grumpymort as a friend

Worth a read

Simon Jordan - Be careful what you wish for

I know its not the same type of book you listed but well worth a read for any Palace fan.

 


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View ASCPFC's Profile ASCPFC Flag Pro-Cathedral/caravan park 02 Sep 21 4.29pm Send a Private Message to ASCPFC Add ASCPFC as a friend

Originally posted by Badger11

Both Excellent books.

Some I have read this year.

- Where the crawdads sing (deep south shades of to kill a mockingbird)
- Shadow of the wind (there are 4 in the series, gothic Barcelona)
- Shardlake series by C J Samson medieval murder mysteries excellent.
- The Midnight Library - Girl kills herself and finds she is in purgatory.
- Wolf Hall Trilogy
- Seven Years in Tibet much better than the movie.
- My brilliant friend - Elena Ferrante life in Naples
- Citizen Clem a biography of Clement Attlee
- A fine balance - Life in India during the emergency.
- Nathaniel's Nutmeg - true story of how we lost Indonesia and gained NY.


Being an actual Tudor historian, I just couldn't bring myself to read Wolf Hall - although I bought my partner the expensive hard back which she didn't read.
Shadow of the Wind intrigues me now. Will have to give it a go. Thanks.

 


Red and Blue Army!

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View ASCPFC's Profile ASCPFC Flag Pro-Cathedral/caravan park 02 Sep 21 4.30pm Send a Private Message to ASCPFC Add ASCPFC as a friend

Originally posted by Teddy Eagle


Since you like crime stories - some maybe lesser known Scottish authors:

Craig Robertson
Craig Russell
T. F. Muir
Caro Ramsay
Tony Black
Alan Parks
Denzil Meyrick
Alex Gray

I liked Kellman. How late it was, how late. Grim but just so Scottish.

 


Red and Blue Army!

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