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October 2 2022 5.04pm

Letís celebrate the left

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View silvertop's Profile silvertop Flag Portishead 01 Sep 22 10.07am Send a Private Message to silvertop Add silvertop as a friend

Originally posted by Stirlingsays

The right-wing Swedish Democrats are now the largest party in the latest poll.

The election is in just a few weeks.

More and more Swedish are tired of the negatives that neo liberal globalism has introduced into their formerly low crime and socially cohesive country.

Edited by silvertop (01 Sep 2022 10.08am)

 

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View silvertop's Profile silvertop Flag Portishead 01 Sep 22 10.07am Send a Private Message to silvertop Add silvertop as a friend

Originally posted by silvertop

Sweden has an issue with far right, intolerance and racial disharmony.

It is also something of an over-bearing Big Brother country and a few people I now who tried to settle there came back.

 

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View silvertop's Profile silvertop Flag Portishead 01 Sep 22 10.08am Send a Private Message to silvertop Add silvertop as a friend

Originally posted by silvertop

 

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Yellow Card - User has been warned of conduct on the messageboards View Glazier#1's Profile Glazier#1 Flag 01 Sep 22 10.37am Send a Private Message to Glazier#1 Add Glazier#1 as a friend

Money not my God either, I can assure you, Cryrst.

I work as a lecturer in an FE college and have had to watch as more and more staff get trimmed, pushing the workload onto the remaining staff.

The level of stress in the job is immense as we are teaching the students who didn't make it to uni, are more kinaesthetically minded. In my subject, English, there are those who just don't want to do it and many will refuse, try to be disruptive and even violent in the process: all part of the job.

Control in the classroom is a challenge, I can assure you again.

As a lecturer, I trained in order to be able to teach: it's a highly - specialised profession yet many lecturers are now employed on a 'sessional' basis ie zero-hours contracts so they're only paid for their time in front of students. All the other, vital, work like prep, marking etc is not paid. That's being employed, essentially, on a casual basis, without the benefits of salaried staff.

Now, there are those who say (maybe you are one of them) 'well, you don't go into teaching for the money' and that is true-to a certain extent.

I'm afraid, though, that we've reached the point where it seems that the piss is being taken.

We carry out an very valuable role in teaching young adults as they prepare for the world of work. The College says they cannot give us more money because 'We are a business and would go into debt'. A business. Yet their funding comes, to a great extent, from the state and that funding has got less and less in real terms over the years and that means the colleges themselves are between a rock and a hard place.

Meanwhile, many of the students I teach have parents who do, indeed, go out and seek other jobs. Some have two or three but are still unable to cope financially; I really feel for them, working their butts off like honest citizens but finding themselves in the state they're in.

Yet, for all that, I don't despise other workers for taking industrial action. Wages in this country are being driven down further and further and I don't think that's fair. It's not like the workforce over the last 10 years has been militant; far from it. I think they've been very patient.

Most worrying is that, before long, young people who are the future of teaching will be saying: "Nah, what's the point of doing that as a profession? I'll find another job to look for", as you suggest, and the young students of this country, the country's future, in essence, are the ones that are affected.

Edited by Glazier#1 (01 Sep 2022 10.44am)

 

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View The Dolphin's Profile The Dolphin Flag 01 Sep 22 11.04am Send a Private Message to The Dolphin Add The Dolphin as a friend

Originally posted by Glazier#1

Not quite sure what you mean by this, Badge.

What is that?

[Link]

 

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Yellow Card - User has been warned of conduct on the messageboards View Glazier#1's Profile Glazier#1 Flag 01 Sep 22 11.21am Send a Private Message to Glazier#1 Add Glazier#1 as a friend

Oh, I see.

Cheers.

I don't have a choice, me. Can't sleep at night, thinking about my job.

Rubber hammer needed.

Or liquid cosh. lol.

 

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View cryrst's Profile cryrst Flag The garden of England 01 Sep 22 11.31am Send a Private Message to cryrst Add cryrst as a friend

Originally posted by Glazier#1

Money not my God either, I can assure you, Cryrst.

I work as a lecturer in an FE college and have had to watch as more and more staff get trimmed, pushing the workload onto the remaining staff.

The level of stress in the job is immense as we are teaching the students who didn't make it to uni, are more kinaesthetically minded. In my subject, English, there are those who just don't want to do it and many will refuse, try to be disruptive and even violent in the process: all part of the job.

Control in the classroom is a challenge, I can assure you again.

As a lecturer, I trained in order to be able to teach: it's a highly - specialised profession yet many lecturers are now employed on a 'sessional' basis ie zero-hours contracts so they're only paid for their time in front of students. All the other, vital, work like prep, marking etc is not paid. That's being employed, essentially, on a casual basis, without the benefits of salaried staff.

Now, there are those who say (maybe you are one of them) 'well, you don't go into teaching for the money' and that is true-to a certain extent.

I'm afraid, though, that we've reached the point where it seems that the piss is being taken.

We carry out an very valuable role in teaching young adults as they prepare for the world of work. The College says they cannot give us more money because 'We are a business and would go into debt'. A business. Yet their funding comes, to a great extent, from the state and that funding has got less and less in real terms over the years and that means the colleges themselves are between a rock and a hard place.

Meanwhile, many of the students I teach have parents who do, indeed, go out and seek other jobs. Some have two or three but are still unable to cope financially; I really feel for them, working their butts off like honest citizens but finding themselves in the state they're in.

Yet, for all that, I don't despise other workers for taking industrial action. Wages in this country are being driven down further and further and I don't think that's fair. It's not like the workforce over the last 10 years has been militant; far from it. I think they've been very patient.

Most worrying is that, before long, young people who are the future of teaching will be saying: "Nah, what's the point of doing that as a profession? I'll find another job to look for", as you suggest, and the young students of this country, the country's future, in essence, are the ones that are affected.

Edited by Glazier#1 (01 Sep 2022 10.44am)

Firstly thanks for the response. Whatís FE?
Anyhow the issue I have with the education system in this country was created by a former hmg. Basically forcing kids to go to school if they canít get a job and creating some form of utopia if you go to uni. I was 16 when I started my apprentiship but had left school 4 months earlier before getting said apprentiship. That wouldnít be allowed now. If kids can only leave at 18 years old why not start school at 7 years old. I disliked school very much and loads of kids do as well. Iím not surprised they are disruptive ; they donít want to be there. I would let them leave at 16 pay them a nominal dole and stop it at 18 if they havenít got a job. Exceptions apply I get that. Maybe even pay said dole if they go to school., kids might actually then choose to learn knowing that having a few quid is good. You teach older kids I get but their dislike started way before they got to you. It needs a rethink as itís not working. The issue is politics and arguing whose correct always gets in the way.
As for the strikes and wanting huge rises for a situation that will settle down in the near future with the inflation issue. Iíve seen decent offers but the unions want more. Travel on trains has decreased since covid. Even I can see less people about in town so where is this money coming from. A huge rise has to be allied to adaptions and efficiency changes. This means less staff and imo you canít have it both ways a big rise forever and less income. Also it isnít just pay rises; itís the pension, NI etc, so the 10% they want is actually about 16%.

 

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View cryrst's Profile cryrst Flag The garden of England 01 Sep 22 11.33am Send a Private Message to cryrst Add cryrst as a friend

Further education

 

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View The Dolphin's Profile The Dolphin Flag 01 Sep 22 11.51am Send a Private Message to The Dolphin Add The Dolphin as a friend

I understand - but never agree with - strikes.
What riles me is that often decent offers are turned down because of the conditions that go with them and not the % offered.
I get that some conditions will not be popular but with the railways it is mainly about getting rid of "Spanish practices" and I see nothing wrong with that - in their case they are archaic, costly and pointless.
I suspect that on the whole if the general public were privy to the details of the offers and rejections then the Unions might be surprised at the strength of public feeling against them.
On the other hand - when offers are derisory and conditions way too harsh they would get public support.
The truth from both sides would be helpful!
In the real world - the private sector has to suck it up and take what increases it can get - often lower than public sector rises and for longer working hours (generally), less holidays and lower pensions.
The public sector needs to get real but I can't see that coming anytime soon.

 

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Yellow Card - User has been warned of conduct on the messageboards View Glazier#1's Profile Glazier#1 Flag 01 Sep 22 12.30pm Send a Private Message to Glazier#1 Add Glazier#1 as a friend

Originally posted by cryrst

Firstly thanks for the response. Whatís FE?
Anyhow the issue I have with the education system in this country was created by a former hmg. Basically forcing kids to go to school if they canít get a job and creating some form of utopia if you go to uni. I was 16 when I started my apprentiship but had left school 4 months earlier before getting said apprentiship. That wouldnít be allowed now. If kids can only leave at 18 years old why not start school at 7 years old. I disliked school very much and loads of kids do as well. Iím not surprised they are disruptive ; they donít want to be there. I would let them leave at 16 pay them a nominal dole and stop it at 18 if they havenít got a job. Exceptions apply I get that. Maybe even pay said dole if they go to school., kids might actually then choose to learn knowing that having a few quid is good. You teach older kids I get but their dislike started way before they got to you. It needs a rethink as itís not working. The issue is politics and arguing whose correct always gets in the way.
As for the strikes and wanting huge rises for a situation that will settle down in the near future with the inflation issue. Iíve seen decent offers but the unions want more. Travel on trains has decreased since covid. Even I can see less people about in town so where is this money coming from. A huge rise has to be allied to adaptions and efficiency changes. This means less staff and imo you canít have it both ways a big rise forever and less income. Also it isnít just pay rises; itís the pension, NI etc, so the 10% they want is actually about 16%.

Those that are at FE are there actually studying trades like bricklaying, chippies, sparks, hairdressing catering you name, in order to get trade quals. While they're doing that, they are required to study English and Maths to a certain standard. (Employers have asked for this) so these numeracy and literacy classes run alongside their main courses.

Many do go on to apprenticeships from college, as it happens. They're not the same as the traditional ones that we might know - full three year ones and some might argue that some employers treat them as cheap labour but, whatever, they are there.

Edited by Glazier#1 (01 Sep 2022 12.32pm)

 

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Yellow Card - User has been warned of conduct on the messageboards View Glazier#1's Profile Glazier#1 Flag 01 Sep 22 12.42pm Send a Private Message to Glazier#1 Add Glazier#1 as a friend

Originally posted by The Dolphin

I understand - but never agree with - strikes.
What riles me is that often decent offers are turned down because of the conditions that go with them and not the % offered.
I get that some conditions will not be popular but with the railways it is mainly about getting rid of "Spanish practices" and I see nothing wrong with that - in their case they are archaic, costly and pointless.
I suspect that on the whole if the general public were privy to the details of the offers and rejections then the Unions might be surprised at the strength of public feeling against them.
On the other hand - when offers are derisory and conditions way too harsh they would get public support.
The truth from both sides would be helpful!
In the real world - the private sector has to suck it up and take what increases it can get - often lower than public sector rises and for longer working hours (generally), less holidays and lower pensions.
The public sector needs to get real but I can't see that coming anytime soon.

The trouble is that companies continually want to drive wages down further and further. Concerning the highlighted bit, Dolph, P&O Ferries just sacked their staff (by video, without any warning) in total and took on 'agency' staff, all working below the minimum working wage and were simply allowed to do so. It was found not to be illegal and they get away with it. What a message to send to other companies. That kind of practice ought to be against labour law, surely? P&O today, you and me tomorrow.

If this is 'getting real' well, I just don't know. I would say that it better to protect hard working people rather than just simply be jealous of public sector staff and support a 'race to the bottom' for all.

 

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View Badger11's Profile Badger11 Flag Beckenham 01 Sep 22 1.33pm Send a Private Message to Badger11 Add Badger11 as a friend

Originally posted by Glazier#1

Oh, I see.

Cheers.

I don't have a choice, me. Can't sleep at night, thinking about my job.

Rubber hammer needed.

Or liquid cosh. lol.

When I first started work my new colleague didn't like my attitude (I worked hard) she tried to being me down to her lazy level constantly criticising me and the management. I ignored her and eventually they got rid.

In theory I am all in favour of a work life balance but I suspect this trend will just attract people who are lazy. Of course you should not be answering emails on the beach but if you are not prepared to show some get up and go others will, if not in this country then elsewhere.

Already we have unions promoting WFH and yet they don't seem to understand that if you can do the job 30 miles from work then someone else can do it 3000 miles from work.

Careful what you wish for as they say.

 


One more point

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