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February 8 2023 7.42am

The rise of automation

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View Blue'n'red's Profile Blue'n'red Flag Field of Chels (Orpington) 29 Jun 17 7.48am Send a Private Message to Blue'n'red Add Blue'n'red as a friend

I work for Ocado ... night shift in Hatfield, but I live in Orpington (hell of a commute) ... a new CFC is opening up in Erith at some point this year but I am being told that it will be mostly robots ... I've applied for a transfer anyway ... apparently the coke factory in Sidcup is fully automated?

 


They say hard work never hurt anyone ... but why take a chance?

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View Lyons550's Profile Lyons550 Flag Shirley 29 Jun 17 8.11am Send a Private Message to Lyons550 Add Lyons550 as a friend

Originally posted by Ginger Pubic Wig

...steel mills that can produce 500k tons a year with 14 employees...machines that can diagnose cancer better than top doctors...machines that really can learn stuff.

Huge -- to the order of at least hundreds of millions of people -- swathes of humanity are about to be made redundant. And at many levels of work.

Then what? What is a good direction to send your kids in to have a prosperous working life??

I'm very interested in the topic, how people believe it will shape our futures, and what, if anything, the legislative response should/will be.


Database design and SQL... Everything is becoming reliant on data held in databases now.... And there is currently a shortage of British skills in this area

 


The Voice of Reason In An Otherwise Mediocre World

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View mezzer's Profile mezzer Flag Main Stand, Block F, Row 20 seat 1... 29 Jun 17 8.56am Send a Private Message to mezzer Add mezzer as a friend

If you can't beat them.....I invest in a Robotics & Automation ETF. Strong returns to date and an investment in the future (whether you believe in that future is another matter - it's not changing anytime soon).

The jobs least at risk are things like catering, domestic cleaning and gardening. Those most at risk tend to be the better paid things (excluding assembly lines) with two of the most at risk being chartered accountancy and fund management.

And teaching is not immune. May cause a bit of a stir for the government that brings it in, mind.

 


Living down here does have some advantages. At least you can see them cry.

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Brentmiester_General Flag Front line in the battle against t... 29 Jun 17 8.57am

Originally posted by Lyons550

Database design and SQL... Everything is becoming reliant on data held in databases now.... And there is currently a shortage of British skills in this area

Kids will be pumped with retalin and taught how to computer program. What a lovely future.

 


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View Michaelawt85's Profile Michaelawt85 Flag Bexley 29 Jun 17 9.14am Send a Private Message to Michaelawt85 Add Michaelawt85 as a friend

Originally posted by Blue'n'red

I work for Ocado ... night shift in Hatfield, but I live in Orpington (hell of a commute) ... a new CFC is opening up in Erith at some point this year but I am being told that it will be mostly robots ... I've applied for a transfer anyway ... apparently the coke factory in Sidcup is fully automated?

Coca cola schwepps is to a large extent. Humans are there for when the machinery breaks as it frequently does. As in umpteen times a day!

 


When I was a young girl my Mother said to me.. You listen here kid you're CPFC

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View DaWick's Profile DaWick Flag Kingston 29 Jun 17 9.17am Send a Private Message to DaWick Add DaWick as a friend

SQL and Data might be a good shout
Security is a growth area too according to a CIO I spoke to last year

Other safer areas, apparently, are jobs where relationships & interactions are important.

I reckon that people in the building trade might be ok too. Significant amount of houses have highly customised building, plumbing and electrical set ups

 

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View Part Time James's Profile Part Time James Flag 29 Jun 17 9.18am Send a Private Message to Part Time James Add Part Time James as a friend

Originally posted by Ginger Pubic Wig

...steel mills that can produce 500k tons a year with 14 employees...machines that can diagnose cancer better than top doctors...machines that really can learn stuff.

Huge -- to the order of at least hundreds of millions of people -- swathes of humanity are about to be made redundant. And at many levels of work.

Then what? What is a good direction to send your kids in to have a prosperous working life??

I'm very interested in the topic, how people believe it will shape our futures, and what, if anything, the legislative response should/will be.


Easy. Become s*** hot at fixing broken robots.

 




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View Lyons550's Profile Lyons550 Flag Shirley 29 Jun 17 9.55am Send a Private Message to Lyons550 Add Lyons550 as a friend

Originally posted by DaWick

SQL and Data might be a good shout
Security is a growth area too according to a CIO I spoke to last year

Other safer areas, apparently, are jobs where relationships & interactions are important.

I reckon that people in the building trade might be ok too. Significant amount of houses have highly customised building, plumbing and electrical set ups


I'm actually starting to 're-skill' myself by obtaining SQL qualifications...then looking to go Self Employed companies are paying ridiculous amounts (avg 400 a day)for people with even basic SQL...problem is at the moment most are from abroad as we dont have enough people in the UK with the skillsets.

Not just us either...a lot of the emerging economies are paying even more.

Mate of mine has just landed 1250 a day on a 3yr contract in Quatar...

 


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jamiemartin721 Flag Reading 29 Jun 17 10.11am

Originally posted by Ginger Pubic Wig

...steel mills that can produce 500k tons a year with 14 employees...machines that can diagnose cancer better than top doctors...machines that really can learn stuff.

Huge -- to the order of at least hundreds of millions of people -- swathes of humanity are about to be made redundant. And at many levels of work.

Then what? What is a good direction to send your kids in to have a prosperous working life??

I'm very interested in the topic, how people believe it will shape our futures, and what, if anything, the legislative response should/will be.



Ignore the concept of trying to be 'like everyone else', because if you're chasing what is the 'new industry now', by the time you've been through the education and graduate systems, you'll be one of the many in what was once a sparse industry.

Income is dictated by supply and demand, not by skills sets. You're better off finding something you enjoy, that you do well and working in that field - because you'll rise to some prominence and speciality, and that usually entails a good return.

You can earn a good wage in most fields, provided you go far enough, and have the talent. If you don't have the skills and talent, even if you go into an area which pays well, you won't last.

You can earn more as a good painter and decorator as you can as an average IT techie. A good musician can usually find well paid work as a session musician.

The thing is, if you push yourself into something you don't enjoy, you'll stagnate and feel like you wasted your youth, pursuing dreams that won't sustain you in later life.

But don't do something just because of the money, find the joy in it.

A friend of mine makes an excellent living on the back of obtaining her PHd in Film Studies. She writes books, gives lectures, presentations all around the world (her first book was on Hammer Horror, her speciality is Cinematography of the Holocaust. Sure she probably could have earned more had she been a top scientist or something, but she still earns around 40k a year in terms of her lectures at universities, plus 2-4k for delivering additional lectures, or seminars around the world plus income from writing papers and advances on books and grant money for research (and even occasionally movie money for consultancy).

 


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jamiemartin721 Flag Reading 29 Jun 17 10.14am

Originally posted by Brentmiester_General

Kids will be pumped with retalin and taught how to computer program. What a lovely future.

Give it 20 years or so, and most people will be able to program (its seriously easier now than at any other time, and that's just going to continue). You don't see that many real programmers anymore - Mostly its developers using specific tools to produce product, and producing some integration scripts to utilise different tools functionality.

 


"One Nation Under God, has turned into One Nation Under the Influence of One Drug"
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jamiemartin721 Flag Reading 29 Jun 17 10.23am

Originally posted by Lyons550


I'm actually starting to 're-skill' myself by obtaining SQL qualifications...then looking to go Self Employed companies are paying ridiculous amounts (avg 400 a day)for people with even basic SQL...problem is at the moment most are from abroad as we dont have enough people in the UK with the skillsets.

Not just us either...a lot of the emerging economies are paying even more.

Mate of mine has just landed 1250 a day on a 3yr contract in Quatar...

My advice, is to learn other skills along side it as well. Just being able to be a SQL developer won't serve you too well in the meantime. Try to get experience in development planning, integration management, technical lead etc as well.

IT massively rewards specialist technical skills, but usually only for about 5-10 years, and by that time the day rates slump down to a reasonable average (400 a day isn't all that much as IT day rates go, I've worked with Project Management Officers who earn that).

The SQL bubble won't last. It contracting market has seen many of these patterns (when I started in IT web developers were king, now its a really competitive field with most of the people who were 'just capable' having been long since pushed out of the market).

The trick to IT is to develop non-technical skills sets if you want it to last - because IT has always lacked people without pure IT skills.

Things like Configuration Management, Change Management, Technical Writing, Release Management, Development and Integration Manager, Defect Management, Project Management, Technical Officer etc have a longer career span for a contractor, and most techie contractors long term end up moving into these kind of areas.

 


"One Nation Under God, has turned into One Nation Under the Influence of One Drug"
[Link]

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Brentmiester_General Flag Front line in the battle against t... 29 Jun 17 10.46am

What my business does can never be replaced by robots. Ha! f*** you robots.

Edited by Brentmiester_General (29 Jun 2017 10.50am)

 


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