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September 18 2019 1.04pm

SKY Sports' obsession with racism.

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View PalazioVecchio's Profile PalazioVecchio Flag south pole 12 Feb 19 2.22pm Send a Private Message to PalazioVecchio Add PalazioVecchio as a friend

do the tv companies turn a blind eye to sectarian racism ?

neil lennon has suffered years of abuse and yet very little fuss made of it on the media. Whatever about him being a bit of an idiot, the brutality of his treatment for many years was a crime.


is it only racist if it is against people of colour ? what about anti Russian racism in the british media ?

 


from the Etihad, Emirates, Molyneux & Anfield to Old Trafford.....Raptors on the Road

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View Rudi Hedman's Profile Rudi Hedman Flag Caterham 12 Feb 19 4.36pm Send a Private Message to Rudi Hedman Add Rudi Hedman as a friend

Originally posted by EverybodyDannsNow

Thereís tons of accents and dialects which have started when an accent/dialect was already there; it doesnít make any sense as a point - if not all (Iíve never seen anything on the type of air point you mentioned), the vast majority of accents are entirely manufactured.

Most people adjust how they speak when it comes to employment; I certainly speak completely differently when Iím with mates, compared to at work.

I bet you some canít change how they sound and sound like the annoying young lady on the kfc advert. Ď10 pieces of chicken for only £9.99. The family bucket. Only at kfc.í People want to sound like this? Throw some of your aims and dreams in the bin with the bucket of chicken bones.

Name first world or developed country where accents have been started where there already is one, or many seeing as this chat has spread into other parts of Britain. Even a lot of white youngsters at white schools in the Caribbean have had a real Caribbean accent, or both Caribbean and the accent of their parents. Unnecessary starting a new accent in a developed country and in a capital city like London with all the opportunities it has when you were born there or moved there early enough to make it your first language is about as short sighted and stupid as it gets.

Please prove me wrong. Why it was necessary, where itís happened before, and how wealth, power and authority will be in the hands of people with this accent other than rappers or footballers. Iíd loved to be proved wrong but all it will create is lack of opportunities or a 2 sided society or job market. Iíll feel like Iíll need a translator or subtitles at some point anyway.


Edited by Rudi Hedman (12 Feb 2019 4.40pm)

 


COYP

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ChrisGC Flag Wantage 12 Feb 19 5.38pm

Originally posted by Hrolf The Ganger

Yes it has evolved in more recent times but certainly, there were White boys using Jamaican phrases and slipping into the occasional Jamaican accent, in a non mocking way, when I was at school in the '70s.

I think what you're referring to is "street" talk.

This completely made up ridiculous whine that people like Professor Green or Stormzy speak in. It doesn't seem to matter what colour or part of England you're from, this accent is immitated.

Ya get me, fam?

 

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View EverybodyDannsNow's Profile EverybodyDannsNow Flag SE19 12 Feb 19 6.03pm Send a Private Message to EverybodyDannsNow Add EverybodyDannsNow as a friend

Originally posted by Rudi Hedman

I bet you some canít change how they sound and sound like the annoying young lady on the kfc advert. Ď10 pieces of chicken for only £9.99. The family bucket. Only at kfc.í People want to sound like this? Throw some of your aims and dreams in the bin with the bucket of chicken bones.

Name first world or developed country where accents have been started where there already is one, or many seeing as this chat has spread into other parts of Britain. Even a lot of white youngsters at white schools in the Caribbean have had a real Caribbean accent, or both Caribbean and the accent of their parents. Unnecessary starting a new accent in a developed country and in a capital city like London with all the opportunities it has when you were born there or moved there early enough to make it your first language is about as short sighted and stupid as it gets.

Please prove me wrong. Why it was necessary, where itís happened before, and how wealth, power and authority will be in the hands of people with this accent other than rappers or footballers. Iíd loved to be proved wrong but all it will create is lack of opportunities or a 2 sided society or job market. Iíll feel like Iíll need a translator or subtitles at some point anyway.


Edited by Rudi Hedman (12 Feb 2019 4.40pm)

Iíve no idea what youíre on about in the first paragraph.

England is obviously an example where accents have been started where there is already one - I donít quite understand how you are contesting that point - cockney, essex - take your pick, theyíre no different.

Iíve never said itís necessary, but I also donít view it as a problem - this topic only ever is an issue when itís modern London street talk - I think cockney sounds bloody ridiculous, but if thatís how people want to speak, thatís up to them.

The ramblings about power and wealth is just bizarre - what point do you think Iím making exactly? That street talk should take over the country?

An ability to change how you present yourself in a professional capacity has been a crucial skill for a long time - thatís still the case. Those who fail to present themselves professionally will struggle.

People can speak how they want - what a ridiculous thing to get your back up about.

 

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View EverybodyDannsNow's Profile EverybodyDannsNow Flag SE19 12 Feb 19 6.06pm Send a Private Message to EverybodyDannsNow Add EverybodyDannsNow as a friend

Originally posted by ChrisGC

I think what you're referring to is "street" talk.

This completely made up ridiculous whine that people like Professor Green or Stormzy speak in. It doesn't seem to matter what colour or part of England you're from, this accent is immitated.

Ya get me, fam?

Again, which accents/dialects like this arenít made up? Itís such a null point.

Stormzy and Professor Green both grew up in areas where they would have been surrounded by people speaking like that, and unsurprisingly picked it up - why do they deserve criticism for that?

 

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View Stirlingsays's Profile Stirlingsays Flag Wisbech, England 12 Feb 19 6.22pm Send a Private Message to Stirlingsays Holmesdale Online Elite Member Add Stirlingsays as a friend

Originally posted by EverybodyDannsNow

Again, which accents/dialects like this arenít made up? Itís such a null point.

Stormzy and Professor Green both grew up in areas where they would have been surrounded by people speaking like that, and unsurprisingly picked it up - why do they deserve criticism for that?


Because it's poor language rather than educated language. Because it limits your range socially. They don't live in a society where they have no choice in this matter. I grew up on a council estate, it's isn't a requirement to sound stupid.

Now, if people wish to talk 'street language' with all the economic and social issues that visits upon their prospects then good luck to them. For every Stormzy or Green that makes it there will be countless that don't.

However, the message that poor language skills and choices don't deserve any criticism isn't a good one in my estimation.

Good schools fight that battle on a daily basis.

Edited by Stirlingsays (12 Feb 2019 6.28pm)

 

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View EverybodyDannsNow's Profile EverybodyDannsNow Flag SE19 12 Feb 19 6.45pm Send a Private Message to EverybodyDannsNow Add EverybodyDannsNow as a friend

Originally posted by Stirlingsays


Because it's poor language rather than educated language. Because it limits your range socially. They don't live in a society where they have no choice in this matter. I grew up on a council estate, it's isn't a requirement to sound stupid.

Now, if people wish to talk 'street language' with all the economic and social issues that visits upon their prospects then good luck to them. For every Stormzy or Green that makes it there will be countless that don't.

However, the message that poor language skills and choices don't deserve any criticism isn't a good one in my estimation.

Good schools fight that battle on a daily basis.

Edited by Stirlingsays (12 Feb 2019 6.28pm)

Thatís a more convincing argument, but I still donít entirely agree; I have friends whoíve spoken what Iím sure you would consider Ďstreetí for their whole life, but they have the capacity to switch it on and off depending on their setting, and they do very well professionally.

For them, that way of communicating in social settings is a message in itself; itís part of their identity, gives insight into their background and ultimately helps to form relationships - I donít think thatís worthy of criticism.

I do agree though that if you chose to speak as such, without an ability to dip in and out of it, you should accept the consequences on your successes professionally.

Out of interest, do you hold the same view of people who chose to speak cockney, for example?

 

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View Rudi Hedman's Profile Rudi Hedman Flag Caterham 12 Feb 19 7.01pm Send a Private Message to Rudi Hedman Add Rudi Hedman as a friend

This cockney point is bl00dy ridiculous actually. For a start itís been around for hundreds and hundreds of years, going back to no doubt Elizabethan times and further, and evolved from Anglo Saxon. This silly street talk is completely made up because some youths without a clue thought it sounded good in the early Ď90s. One naturally evolved and the other didnít.

 


COYP

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View Stirlingsays's Profile Stirlingsays Flag Wisbech, England 12 Feb 19 7.04pm Send a Private Message to Stirlingsays Holmesdale Online Elite Member Add Stirlingsays as a friend

Originally posted by EverybodyDannsNow

Thatís a more convincing argument, but I still donít entirely agree; I have friends whoíve spoken what Iím sure you would consider Ďstreetí for their whole life, but they have the capacity to switch it on and off depending on their setting, and they do very well professionally.

For them, that way of communicating in social settings is a message in itself; itís part of their identity, gives insight into their background and ultimately helps to form relationships - I donít think thatís worthy of criticism.

I do agree though that if you chose to speak as such, without an ability to dip in and out of it, you should accept the consequences on your successes professionally.

Out of interest, do you hold the same view of people who chose to speak cockney, for example?

'Cockney'? That's practically been wiped out.

I might have warmer feelings towards the speech of my own part heritage as a Londoner, however of course, the same standard applies.

It's self limiting and anti education...in an environment, unlike the past, where there are no excuses for it.

 

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View Rudi Hedman's Profile Rudi Hedman Flag Caterham 12 Feb 19 7.09pm Send a Private Message to Rudi Hedman Add Rudi Hedman as a friend

Originally posted by EverybodyDannsNow

Iíve no idea what youíre on about in the first paragraph.

England is obviously an example where accents have been started where there is already one - I donít quite understand how you are contesting that point - cockney, essex - take your pick, theyíre no different.

Iíve never said itís necessary, but I also donít view it as a problem - this topic only ever is an issue when itís modern London street talk - I think cockney sounds bloody ridiculous, but if thatís how people want to speak, thatís up to them.

The ramblings about power and wealth is just bizarre - what point do you think Iím making exactly? That street talk should take over the country?

An ability to change how you present yourself in a professional capacity has been a crucial skill for a long time - thatís still the case. Those who fail to present themselves professionally will struggle.

People can speak how they want - what a ridiculous thing to get your back up about.

The cockney accent in Essex is a stupid example or argument because those people came from London before moving out, or their parents, grandparents and so on did. Nothing manufactured or invented there.

I obviously donít think street talk should take over the country because it sounds ridiculous, and you know my point is it wonít either, because opportunities will be limited. Money is power, and a street talker from a London Borough wonít be able to compete with someone from anywhere in the country who doesnít talk in street or with that sound.

Maybe some will be able to lose the street sound, or just think they are. It isnít easy to hide. Sounding the part is often just as important as knowledge. Many will realise this in many moments in life.

Edited by Rudi Hedman (12 Feb 2019 7.16pm)

 


COYP

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View PalazioVecchio's Profile PalazioVecchio Flag south pole 12 Feb 19 10.36pm Send a Private Message to PalazioVecchio Add PalazioVecchio as a friend

Originally posted by Rudi Hedman

This cockney point is bl00dy ridiculous actually. For a start itís been around for hundreds and hundreds of years, going back to no doubt Elizabethan times and further, and evolved from Anglo Saxon. This silly street talk is completely made up because some youths without a clue thought it sounded good in the early Ď90s. One naturally evolved and the other didnít.

large movements of one tribe into an area will change the linguistic profile of that area.

Scouse has a strong irish influence from the time of the Industrial Revolution.

the town of Corby took in tons of scottish migrants ages ago and today it sounds way different to the other towns in its vicinity.

tell me your grandparents 'chose' their accent or they just picked it up at school aged 4 with little consciousness of the socio-economic politics of the whole thing. Of da whole ting.

if you believe accent is just a choice, try working the glasgow shipyards with a voice like Tony Bliar.

Croydon black boys who speak jafaikan do so because they are hearing it at home and in the schoolyard....not much deliberate decision, all happening by osmosis. I would be reluctant to crucify them if you are struggling to understand the speech. Try understanding Geordie - its got Viking words in it. Innit ?

 


from the Etihad, Emirates, Molyneux & Anfield to Old Trafford.....Raptors on the Road

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ChrisGC Flag Wantage 12 Feb 19 10.37pm

Originally posted by EverybodyDannsNow

Thatís a more convincing argument, but I still donít entirely agree; I have friends whoíve spoken what Iím sure you would consider Ďstreetí for their whole life, but they have the capacity to switch it on and off depending on their setting, and they do very well professionally.

For them, that way of communicating in social settings is a message in itself; itís part of their identity, gives insight into their background and ultimately helps to form relationships - I donít think thatís worthy of criticism.

I do agree though that if you chose to speak as such, without an ability to dip in and out of it, you should accept the consequences on your successes professionally.

Out of interest, do you hold the same view of people who chose to speak cockney, for example?

Switch it on and off? How's that a real accent then?

I can switch on and off a pretty decent jock accent, doesn't make me Scottish.

It's a load of bollox. Speak properly (with a regional accent) and have a bit of pride FFS.

 

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