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December 6 2019 8.50pm

Labour Party Supporters: Should Corbyn Step Down?

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View dannyboy1978's Profile dannyboy1978 Flag 23 Sep 19 10.58am Send a Private Message to dannyboy1978 Add dannyboy1978 as a friend

Originally posted by serial thriller

1. The policy was voted for by those 'posh dovies'. That's how a democratic party works.

2. If you're going to have a go at someone, at least spell their name right.

Your funny and I love watching Labour slowly die.

 

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View serial thriller's Profile serial thriller Flag The Promised Land 23 Sep 19 11.10am Send a Private Message to serial thriller Add serial thriller as a friend

Originally posted by dannyboy1978

Your funny and I love watching Labour slowly die.

Since Corbyn became leader Labour has become the largest membership based political party in Europe and the average age of a member has dropped by 10 years. On top of that, the biggest youth movement in history - the climate protests - is becoming more and more closely tied to Labour.

And throughout the party, technocrats from Oxbridge are being replaced by working class activists. If that's a party dying then I'd love to see what growth looks like.

 


If punk ever happened I'd be preaching the law, instead of listenin to Lydon lecture BBC4

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View Rudi Hedman's Profile Rudi Hedman Flag Caterham 23 Sep 19 11.15am Send a Private Message to Rudi Hedman Add Rudi Hedman as a friend

Originally posted by Stirlingsays

Do we support private fire brigades or private armies?

This essentially comes down to what we think is best served via communal effort and what we understand is best served via private ownership.

Private schools are elitist.....I see the benefit of them but it's essentially a benefit for a few.

I see some weaknesses within my own position as well.....I mean if we ban private schools we surrender a plank of meritocracy where the supposed best minds are housed and educated together (when in reality it's more often the richest)....the idea being that we have the best in the most important positions.

But...errrr.

Look at what the products from these schools and later universities have been doing to this country over the last fifty years.

So f**k them.

Come swim in the pool you created.


Edited by Stirlingsays (23 Sep 2019 9.58am)


I see the logic in how closing private schools would improve the chances of the equally gifted pupils in state schools. They will be among more children with non financial backing from their parents.

I’m not sure how it will improve the chances of the less gifted, but I guess there’ll never be impressive names on cvs again that mean a lot of the ones with comprehensives on get chucked in the bin as a way of filtering, even if they’d rather not filter that way.

It won’t reach perfection though as you’ll still get families moving into pricey areas to be among the families aiming for the same school. Inner city kids will be screwed for life still.

I see why Diane Abbott backs it for a few reasons.

Her kid(s) get free education around same kids in its initial stages.
It has to be a complete closure for it to work. One pair of parents can’t make a stand against privatised schools they disagree with if they’re in an area where if they put their kids in state schools there’s very little parental focus on education.

She is a complete idiot but you can still be against something even if you currently go along with it, especially if what you propose currently isn’t a good option because it needs what you propose (closing private schools) for it to be successful.

The people who would or should be worried are those in areas with lots of state schools and a very small choice of private schools who scrimp and save for private education and their kids win scholarships, or wealthy(ier) parents with not particularly clever kids at all (but benefit in life because they sound well spoken, clever, smart), which leads me onto a big big benefit of private schools or being around middle class children...

They sound the part most comprehensive children never will.

This proposal could work and be the biggest change in social mobility. Depends on if enough higher earning labour voters think or see the bigger picture rather than just the immediate wishes for their kids.

I wonder how it would affect the gentrification of London. Not a lot probably. Most office professionals take their kids to the suburbs away from the teenage problems in London.

 


COYP

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View Rudi Hedman's Profile Rudi Hedman Flag Caterham 23 Sep 19 11.19am Send a Private Message to Rudi Hedman Add Rudi Hedman as a friend

Originally posted by serial thriller

1. The policy was voted for by those 'posh dovies'. That's how a democratic party works.

2. If you're going to have a go at someone, at least spell their name right.

How do you know who voted for posh schools to be closed?

Most people at festivals left school years ago.

(I see the merit in closing them. Had to be all or nothing for it to work though)

 


COYP

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View serial thriller's Profile serial thriller Flag The Promised Land 23 Sep 19 11.25am Send a Private Message to serial thriller Add serial thriller as a friend

Originally posted by Rudi Hedman

How do you know who voted for posh schools to be closed?

Most people at festivals left school years ago.

(I see the merit in closing them. Had to be all or nothing for it to work though)

That's how Labour conference works. Each CLP elects delegates who then can propose and vote on policies which can be included in Labour's manifesto.

It's obviously caused controversy, and you are entitled to disagree that this is the best way for a party to function, but it is undoubtedly democratic, and IMO much fairer than having policies decided by think tanks.

 


If punk ever happened I'd be preaching the law, instead of listenin to Lydon lecture BBC4

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View steeleye20's Profile steeleye20 Flag Croydon 23 Sep 19 11.25am Send a Private Message to steeleye20 Add steeleye20 as a friend

On C4 last night, 'The Tories at War'.

And how appalling they are, the whole thing run by some hedge fund manager.

At least Corbyn is not so rotten and corrupt like the conservative party.

 

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View Rudi Hedman's Profile Rudi Hedman Flag Caterham 23 Sep 19 11.25am Send a Private Message to Rudi Hedman Add Rudi Hedman as a friend

Originally posted by serial thriller

Since Corbyn became leader Labour has become the largest membership based political party in Europe and the average age of a member has dropped by 10 years. On top of that, the biggest youth movement in history - the climate protests - is becoming more and more closely tied to Labour.

And throughout the party, technocrats from Oxbridge are being replaced by working class activists. If that's a party dying then I'd love to see what growth looks like.

I see your point that he/it’s a movement for the future, because he’s not cutting it enough now is he, especially through austerity, May, Boris, Brexit (although therein lies another party voting 66/33% rough split is it?).

But what when a lot of these trend followers get a house, mortgage, children and make the gradual move across the political spectrum? A lot of people vote conservative for the one reason (personal finance) and not much more. Young people never think they’ll age but they do, and change their views, or their personal needs change.

 


COYP

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View serial thriller's Profile serial thriller Flag The Promised Land 23 Sep 19 11.34am Send a Private Message to serial thriller Add serial thriller as a friend

Originally posted by Rudi Hedman

I see your point that he/it’s a movement for the future, because he’s not cutting it enough now is he, especially through austerity, May, Boris, Brexit (although therein lies another party voting 66/33% rough split is it?).

But what when a lot of these trend followers get a house, mortgage, children and make the gradual move across the political spectrum? A lot of people vote conservative for the one reason (personal finance) and not much more. Young people never think they’ll age but they do, and change their views, or their personal needs change.

But here's the issue. The current generation will find it much harder to simply 'buy a house' because property prices have gone insane. Their job prospects are significantly worse than previous eras, and unless they are privileged, their kids will be in schools which are far worse funded than in the past.

This is what's radicalising the youth. Not just a decade of low growth and austerity, but 40 years of market fundamentalism which has allowed those with assets and stocks to horde wealth, and disproportionately hit the young, poor and disabled.

 


If punk ever happened I'd be preaching the law, instead of listenin to Lydon lecture BBC4

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View Rudi Hedman's Profile Rudi Hedman Flag Caterham 23 Sep 19 11.36am Send a Private Message to Rudi Hedman Add Rudi Hedman as a friend

Originally posted by serial thriller

That's how Labour conference works. Each CLP elects delegates who then can propose and vote on policies which can be included in Labour's manifesto.

It's obviously caused controversy, and you are entitled to disagree that this is the best way for a party to function, but it is undoubtedly democratic, and IMO much fairer than having policies decided by think tanks.

Agree, but did the thousands at the festival all vote for it, or all privately educated adults around the country (would have) voted for it? We’ll see.

Many of them will value what they’ve been privileged with and how it has and will provide more opportunities, especially if they’re no different to state school educated adults apart from the private school accent. Or I suppose lots may think they’ll never afford the fees so they may as well vote to close them down.

The 7% in private schools who become voters is quite a lot in GE’s, especially as there’ll be quite a few in marginal constituencies.

 


COYP

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View Rudi Hedman's Profile Rudi Hedman Flag Caterham 23 Sep 19 12.06pm Send a Private Message to Rudi Hedman Add Rudi Hedman as a friend

Originally posted by serial thriller

But here's the issue. The current generation will find it much harder to simply 'buy a house' because property prices have gone insane. Their job prospects are significantly worse than previous eras, and unless they are privileged, their kids will be in schools which are far worse funded than in the past.

This is what's radicalising the youth. Not just a decade of low growth and austerity, but 40 years of market fundamentalism which has allowed those with assets and stocks to horde wealth, and disproportionately hit the young, poor and disabled.

Fair points. Capitalism should be and should’ve been regulated more. A lot of this house price and house investment obsession and explosion since 2000 and whatever, whenever it started was due to both lack of government intervention and what I’ve said, a national obsession helped along by people who have nothing better to do and got swept up in the Location Location Location viewing addiction and conversations at work, Homes Under The Hammer and whatever else programmes on tv.

I don’t particularly blame individuals for doing so, but it’s just a little sad that our progression as a country has been measured on expenditure on home improvements, which is why Brexit is so different. Because it means much more than GDP and KPI’s from the Bank of England.

Anyway, as you were. Having a quite left or socialist government will depend on the leader, and I doubt Corbyn is him now and won’t last or be young enough for when he is for these peeved voters.

 


COYP

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View dannyboy1978's Profile dannyboy1978 Flag 23 Sep 19 12.40pm Send a Private Message to dannyboy1978 Add dannyboy1978 as a friend

Originally posted by serial thriller

Since Corbyn became leader Labour has become the largest membership based political party in Europe and the average age of a member has dropped by 10 years. On top of that, the biggest youth movement in history - the climate protests - is becoming more and more closely tied to Labour.

And throughout the party, technocrats from Oxbridge are being replaced by working class activists. If that's a party dying then I'd love to see what growth looks like.

Crack on you vote Labour! PMSL

 

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View dannyboy1978's Profile dannyboy1978 Flag 23 Sep 19 12.42pm Send a Private Message to dannyboy1978 Add dannyboy1978 as a friend

Originally posted by serial thriller

But here's the issue. The current generation will find it much harder to simply 'buy a house' because property prices have gone insane. Their job prospects are significantly worse than previous eras, and unless they are privileged, their kids will be in schools which are far worse funded than in the past.

This is what's radicalising the youth. Not just a decade of low growth and austerity, but 40 years of market fundamentalism which has allowed those with assets and stocks to horde wealth, and disproportionately hit the young, poor and disabled.

Property prices have gone insane because people are paying the prices!!

 

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