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August 9 2022 5.14pm

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View cryrst's Profile cryrst Flag The garden of England 23 Jul 22 6.12pm Send a Private Message to cryrst Add cryrst as a friend

Originally posted by W12

I simply cannot fathom that people are still so blinkered to what’s been done to them these last 2+ years

That isn’t really fair. I’m sure that logic and past issues with medication and reactions ; as I’ve posted prior about aspirin was in peoples thought process. Alongside the facts that adverse reactions are part and parcel of said medication and drugs, whether pill or injection. Have you yourself even once considered that the vaccine may well have saved more lives than it has inadvertently taken or will take/ cause the end of. Not once has this been typed on your keyboard by you. Until both sides of the coin are looked at I doubt your argument and prophecy of doom will be discussed n any way other than them and us. Many people thought long and very hard about making the decision to have the vaccines. You seem to assume that it was an easy choice. It actually wasn’t as I know, and if your choice not to was easy then fair play. I do have a life and a family to support and protect. I looked at some data and decided that having it gave me a better chance of surviving it. I then caught covid and am ok. I possibly would still have been ok without the vaccine so there we are. Who knows?

 

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View W12's Profile W12 23 Jul 22 6.25pm Send a Private Message to W12 Add W12 as a friend

My post was about what is happening now and not what happened when the “vaccines” were pushed on everyone early in early 2021. I can completely understand why people took this stuff but it’s vitally important now to reconcile that the safety data is clearly telling us that these jabs are bad and especially that we should not in any way be giving them to children that trust us implicitly.

No way.

 

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Yellow Card - User has been warned of conduct on the messageboards View Stirlingsays's Profile Stirlingsays Flag 23 Jul 22 7.20pm Send a Private Message to Stirlingsays Holmesdale Online Elite Member Add Stirlingsays as a friend

It's quite incredible that you can have a situation where you are mandated to take a jab on pain of losing your living without the legal protection of being able to later sue for potential damage caused.

That's just plain wrong.

I would go so far as to say it's anti the western tradition.

 


'Who are you and how did you get in here? I'm a locksmith. And, I'm a locksmith.' (Leslie Nielsen)

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View Grumbles's Profile Grumbles 23 Jul 22 8.08pm Send a Private Message to Grumbles Add Grumbles as a friend

Originally posted by W12

I simply cannot fathom that people are still so blinkered to what’s been done to them these last 2+ years

Are conspiracy theories for losers?

The YouGov-Cambridge Programme is currently working with researchers on the “Conspiracy and Democracy” project at Cambridge University to examine the public appeal of conspiracy theories in Britain and Europe.

This includes exploring a range of questions about the prevalence and proponents of conspiracy theories: do they appeal across the political spectrum; are certain groups more likely to embrace them; and do they negatively track power – meaning are voters more prone to believe if their preferred political party is out of government?

For the pilot stage of research, a representative sample of the British public was recently shown a list of statements that might constitute conspiracy, deception or subterfuge, and asked if each was [definitely/probably] true or untrue. Some of these were based on ‘classical’ types of conspiracy theory while others focussed on more typical issues of voter concern:

“Regardless of who is officially in charge of governments, media organisations and companies, there is a secret group of powerful people who really control world events like wars and economic crises”
“The Government is deliberately hiding the truth about how many immigrants really live in this country”
“Humans have made contact with aliens but this fact has been deliberately hidden from the public”
“Officials of the European Union are gradually seeking to take over all law-making powers in this country”
“The US Government played a deliberate role in making the 9/11 terrorist attacks happen in America on 11th September, 2001”
“Some courts in the UK legal system are choosing to adopt Islamic 'Sharia' law”
“The AIDS virus was created and spread around the world on purpose by a secret group or organisation”
“The idea of man-made global warming is a hoax that was deliberately invented to deceive people”

As the table shows below, small majorities are tempted by suggestions of cover-up or subterfuge in immigration (55%) and European influence (52%), which can be seen in part as proxy measures for other prominent trends in current public opinion – namely Euro-scepticism, immigration concerns and distrust in government. By comparison, results show less belief in theories about climate change hoax (18%), Sharia (18%), alien cover-ups (14%), 9/11 involvement by the US Government (11%), and the ‘invention’ of AIDS (8%).

Statement Def/prob true Def/prob NOT true
UK Government is hiding the truth about the number of immigrants living here 55% 25%
EU officials are seeking to take over all law-making powers in the UK 52% 25%
A secret group of powerful people really controls world events 34% 38%
Some UK courts are choosing to adopt 'Sharia' 18% 51%
The idea of man-made global warming is a hoax 18% 57%
Contact with aliens has been deliberately hidden from the public 14% 61%
US Government played deliberate role in making 9/11 attacks happen 11% 66%
AIDS was created/spread around the world on purpose 8% 76%

Results further suggest another distinction. When the proposed deception relates to typical issues of voter concern – e.g. immigration, Europe, cultural integration, climate change – responses tend to reflect predictable political differences: Conservative/UKIP voters are more likely to believe in power-grabbing plots from Brussels; Labour/Lib Dem voters are less prone to believe in climate change hoax.

But a different pattern emerges around theories of less immediate, political context – e.g. about secret global elites, aliens, 9/11 and AIDS – where results tend to reinforce some of the conclusions from wider literature on conspiracy theorising, such as last year’s publication of American Conspiracy Theories by Joe Parent and Joe Uscinski.

In their research on the American context, Parent and Uscinski contended that ‘out-of-power’ voters were more likely to engage with conspiracy theories, while gender made little difference but social grade was a significant factor.

Accordingly in these results, when it comes to the suggestion of a secret cabal controlling world events, Labour and UKIP voters are consistently more likely to speculate than Conservatives or Lib Dems, along with C2DE respondents, while male/female results are broadly similar.

43% of Labour and 46% of UKIP supporters say it is definitely/probably true about “a secret group of powerful people who really control world events like wars and economic crises”, compared with 27% of Conservative and 17% of Lib Dem supporters.
A roughly similar 33% of men and 35% of women say the same, but notably more C2DE respondents do (41%) than ABC1s (29%).

Similar patterns are reflected in responses to theories on 9/11, aliens and AIDS, albeit with smaller differences and less impact on the overall direction of opinion, as the level of perceived credibility is so low. In fact, C2DE respondents are consistently more likely to believe than ABC1s throughout the survey as a whole.

Hence in the British context, at least, it seems those with lower income/education levels or stronger feelings of political exclusion show a greater tendency to speculate on conspiracy, unless it touches on familiar policy issues.

 

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View W12's Profile W12 24 Jul 22 3.00pm Send a Private Message to W12 Add W12 as a friend

Originally posted by Grumbles

Are conspiracy theories for losers?

The YouGov-Cambridge Programme is currently working with researchers on the “Conspiracy and Democracy” project at Cambridge University to examine the public appeal of conspiracy theories in Britain and Europe.

This includes exploring a range of questions about the prevalence and proponents of conspiracy theories: do they appeal across the political spectrum; are certain groups more likely to embrace them; and do they negatively track power – meaning are voters more prone to believe if their preferred political party is out of government?

For the pilot stage of research, a representative sample of the British public was recently shown a list of statements that might constitute conspiracy, deception or subterfuge, and asked if each was [definitely/probably] true or untrue. Some of these were based on ‘classical’ types of conspiracy theory while others focussed on more typical issues of voter concern:

“Regardless of who is officially in charge of governments, media organisations and companies, there is a secret group of powerful people who really control world events like wars and economic crises”
“The Government is deliberately hiding the truth about how many immigrants really live in this country”
“Humans have made contact with aliens but this fact has been deliberately hidden from the public”
“Officials of the European Union are gradually seeking to take over all law-making powers in this country”
“The US Government played a deliberate role in making the 9/11 terrorist attacks happen in America on 11th September, 2001”
“Some courts in the UK legal system are choosing to adopt Islamic 'Sharia' law”
“The AIDS virus was created and spread around the world on purpose by a secret group or organisation”
“The idea of man-made global warming is a hoax that was deliberately invented to deceive people”

As the table shows below, small majorities are tempted by suggestions of cover-up or subterfuge in immigration (55%) and European influence (52%), which can be seen in part as proxy measures for other prominent trends in current public opinion – namely Euro-scepticism, immigration concerns and distrust in government. By comparison, results show less belief in theories about climate change hoax (18%), Sharia (18%), alien cover-ups (14%), 9/11 involvement by the US Government (11%), and the ‘invention’ of AIDS (8%).

Statement Def/prob true Def/prob NOT true
UK Government is hiding the truth about the number of immigrants living here 55% 25%
EU officials are seeking to take over all law-making powers in the UK 52% 25%
A secret group of powerful people really controls world events 34% 38%
Some UK courts are choosing to adopt 'Sharia' 18% 51%
The idea of man-made global warming is a hoax 18% 57%
Contact with aliens has been deliberately hidden from the public 14% 61%
US Government played deliberate role in making 9/11 attacks happen 11% 66%
AIDS was created/spread around the world on purpose 8% 76%

Results further suggest another distinction. When the proposed deception relates to typical issues of voter concern – e.g. immigration, Europe, cultural integration, climate change – responses tend to reflect predictable political differences: Conservative/UKIP voters are more likely to believe in power-grabbing plots from Brussels; Labour/Lib Dem voters are less prone to believe in climate change hoax.

But a different pattern emerges around theories of less immediate, political context – e.g. about secret global elites, aliens, 9/11 and AIDS – where results tend to reinforce some of the conclusions from wider literature on conspiracy theorising, such as last year’s publication of American Conspiracy Theories by Joe Parent and Joe Uscinski.

In their research on the American context, Parent and Uscinski contended that ‘out-of-power’ voters were more likely to engage with conspiracy theories, while gender made little difference but social grade was a significant factor.

Accordingly in these results, when it comes to the suggestion of a secret cabal controlling world events, Labour and UKIP voters are consistently more likely to speculate than Conservatives or Lib Dems, along with C2DE respondents, while male/female results are broadly similar.

43% of Labour and 46% of UKIP supporters say it is definitely/probably true about “a secret group of powerful people who really control world events like wars and economic crises”, compared with 27% of Conservative and 17% of Lib Dem supporters.
A roughly similar 33% of men and 35% of women say the same, but notably more C2DE respondents do (41%) than ABC1s (29%).

Similar patterns are reflected in responses to theories on 9/11, aliens and AIDS, albeit with smaller differences and less impact on the overall direction of opinion, as the level of perceived credibility is so low. In fact, C2DE respondents are consistently more likely to believe than ABC1s throughout the survey as a whole.

Hence in the British context, at least, it seems those with lower income/education levels or stronger feelings of political exclusion show a greater tendency to speculate on conspiracy, unless it touches on familiar policy issues.

Every single f***ing time:

“The Gates Cambridge Scholarship programme was established in October 2000 by a donation of US$210m from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to the University of Cambridge”

[Link]

 

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View W12's Profile W12 24 Jul 22 3.10pm Send a Private Message to W12 Add W12 as a friend

Originally posted by W12

Every single f***ing time:

“The Gates Cambridge Scholarship programme was established in October 2000 by a donation of US0m from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to the University of Cambridge”

[Link]

By the way, I am not low income (far from it actually) but why would that exclude you from having a valid opinion anyway? Also, the majority of this country now have “stronger feelings of political exclusion” because it’s true. Most people in this country still believe a man cannot be a woman and we have far far too much immigration. The problem is that these concerns are not represented by the class that rules us, because, they simply rule us and do not represent us.

 

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Yellow Card - User has been warned of conduct on the messageboards View Stirlingsays's Profile Stirlingsays Flag 24 Jul 22 4.54pm Send a Private Message to Stirlingsays Holmesdale Online Elite Member Add Stirlingsays as a friend

Originally posted by W12

By the way, I am not low income (far from it actually) but why would that exclude you from having a valid opinion anyway? Also, the majority of this country now have “stronger feelings of political exclusion” because it’s true. Most people in this country still believe a man cannot be a woman and we have far far too much immigration. The problem is that these concerns are not represented by the class that rules us, because, they simply rule us and do not represent us.

He should post that in his party's political forum.

I would imagine it would go down like a bad fart in a packed broken lift.

 


'Who are you and how did you get in here? I'm a locksmith. And, I'm a locksmith.' (Leslie Nielsen)

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View Grumbles's Profile Grumbles 24 Jul 22 7.10pm Send a Private Message to Grumbles Add Grumbles as a friend

Originally posted by Stirlingsays

He should post that in his party's political forum.

I would imagine it would go down like a bad fart in a packed broken lift.

What on earth are you talking about?

W12 has owned it, but never said it was based on his delusions, there are plenty of others it fits. I just glad they no longer teach our kids.

Mostly on "early retirements" on gold plated Public Sector pensions. Reckon the "early retirement" reasons generate the bitterness.

 

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Yellow Card - User has been warned of conduct on the messageboards View Stirlingsays's Profile Stirlingsays Flag 25 Jul 22 3.27am Send a Private Message to Stirlingsays Holmesdale Online Elite Member Add Stirlingsays as a friend

Originally posted by Grumbles

What on earth are you talking about?

W12 has owned it, but never said it was based on his delusions, there are plenty of others it fits. I just glad they no longer teach our kids.

Mostly on "early retirements" on gold plated Public Sector pensions. Reckon the "early retirement" reasons generate the bitterness.

You cut and pasted an article that just talks nonsense.

The contention in this last paragraph...apart from being horribly insulting doesn't fit very well among plenty I know about. Peter Hitchens or Neema Parvini for example are two highly educated men who don't fit that classification. I'm reasonably well educated having taught in STEM for years and I'm doing ok. Here's a link to a Guardian article that Hitchens points to as indicative of the false claims made over climate change.

[Link]

You seem to think that anyone who doesn't accept whatever government or the media tell them as the full truth are losers.

Ok, I think that's gullible.

The article you cut and pasted wants to frame conspiracy theories using its own narrow descriptions. Why should anyone accept that? If someone believes in a particular theory they can articulate it themselves and the merits or faults debated on that individual idea.

Is there's a certain 'conspiracy theory' you have an issue with? If so then why not state it instead of hiding behind an article slagging off those who might believe in them.

As for your apparent issue with me or retired teachers? I find it bizarre. Or is it an issue with early retirement pensions?


Edited by Stirlingsays (25 Jul 2022 9.27am)

 


'Who are you and how did you get in here? I'm a locksmith. And, I'm a locksmith.' (Leslie Nielsen)

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View cryrst's Profile cryrst Flag The garden of England 25 Jul 22 6.08am Send a Private Message to cryrst Add cryrst as a friend

Originally posted by Stirlingsays

You cut and pasted an article that just talks nonsense.

The contention in this last paragraph...apart from being horribly insulting doesn't fit very well among plenty I know about. Peter Hitchens or Neema Parvini for example are two highly educated men who don't fit that classification. I'm reasonably well educated having taught in STEM for years and I'm doing ok. Here's a link to a Guardian article that Hitchens points to as indicative of the false claims made over climate change.

[Link]

You seem to think that anyone who doesn't accept whatever government or the media tell them as the full truth are losers.

Ok, I think that's gullible.

The article you cut and pasted wants to frame conspiracy theorys using its own narrow descriptions. Why should anyone accept that? If someone believes in a particular theory they can articulate it themselves and the merits or faults debated on that individual idea.

Is there's a certain 'conspiracy theory' you have an issue with? If so then why not state it instead of hiding behind an article slagging off those who might believe in them?

As for your apparent issue with me or retired teachers? I find it bizarre. Or is it an issue with early retirement pensions?


Edited by Stirlingsays (25 Jul 2022 3.31am)

Come on stirls, you know you are stinking rich and the proof is you paste on some forum. Personally I would have someone typing for me. All that effort

 

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View becky's Profile becky Flag over the moon 25 Jul 22 7.47am Send a Private Message to becky Holmesdale Online Elite Member Add becky as a friend

This thread seems to be wandering off topic - if you wish to discuss conspiracy theories, we already have a thread for that

[Link]

 


A stairway to Heaven and a Highway to Hell give some indication of expected traffic numbers

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View W12's Profile W12 25 Jul 22 8.53am Send a Private Message to W12 Add W12 as a friend

Originally posted by becky

This thread seems to be wandering off topic - if you wish to discuss conspiracy theories, we already have a thread for that

[Link]

The term conspiracy theorist is used when people lack any argument.

It also seems to apply to the people who have proven to have been right for the last two years as events unfolded.

 

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