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June 18 2019 4.43am

Venezuela - socialist paradise

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View Jimenez's Profile Jimenez Flag SELHURSTPARKCHESTER,DA BRONX 27 Jan 19 12.38am Send a Private Message to Jimenez Add Jimenez as a friend

Originally posted by davenotamonkey

"Venezuela isn't really socialist"

"Death to capitalist America trying to meddle and overturn a socialist country"

Pick one, leftards.

I actually saw a group of lefties today on Lexington Ave having a PRO Maduro demo, just about sums up those dimwits.

 


Pro USA & Israel

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View Stirlingsays's Profile Stirlingsays Flag Wisbech, England 27 Jan 19 1.00am Send a Private Message to Stirlingsays Holmesdale Online Elite Member Add Stirlingsays as a friend

Originally posted by Jimenez

I actually saw a group of lefties today on Lexington Ave having a PRO Maduro demo, just about sums up those dimwits.

 

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View Bert the Head's Profile Bert the Head Flag Epsom 05 Feb 19 7.52pm Send a Private Message to Bert the Head Add Bert the Head as a friend

Originally posted by matt_himself

Economy in worst state since the 1940's:

[Link]

Viva la revolution!

Funny how poverty in other Latin American Countries never equates to a failed political system

10 Facts About Poverty in Latin America
One in five Latin Americans lives in chronic poverty conditions. Latin Americans account for 130 million of the nearly 500 million who live in chronic poverty worldwide.

Poverty rates vary from country to country in the Latin American region. With estimated poverty rates floating around 10 percent, Uruguay, Argentina and Chile have the lowest chronic poverty rates. Meanwhile, Nicaragua with 37 percent and Guatemala with 50 percent have the highest chronic poverty rates in Latin America, which are well above the regional average of 21 percent.

Poverty rates can also vary within a country. A single country can have both ends of the spectrum with the highest poverty rate that is eight times higher than the lowest. For example, Brazil has a chronic poverty rate of 5 percent in Santa Catarina, but 40 percent in Ceará.

Poverty in Latin America encompasses both urban and rural areas. Most assume that rural areas have higher poverty rates than urban areas, like in Bolivia, where the amount of people living in rural poverty is 20 percentage points higher than those living in urban poverty. However, the number of urban poor is higher than the number of rural poor in Chile, Brazil, Mexico, Colombia and the Dominican Republic.

Poor Latin Americans lack access to basic health care services. Approximately 20 percent of the Latin American and Caribbean population lack access to health care due to their poverty conditions. The region also has high rates of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity and cancer.

Those living in poverty in Latin America lack access to safe water and sanitation. The World Water Council reported that 77 million people lack access to safe water or live without a water source in their homes. Of the 77 million, 51 million live in rural areas and 26 million live in urban areas. An estimated 256 million rely on latrines and septic tanks as an alternative to basic sanitation.

The lack of education in Latin America lowers prospects of rising out of poverty. One in 12 young people ages 15 to 24 have not completed primary school, and therefore lack the skills necessary to find decent jobs. The same age group represents 40 percent of the total number of unemployed in many Latin American countries. When they are employed, six out of 10 jobs are informal, lacking decent wages, contract agreements and social security rights.

Limited economic opportunities keep the poor in poverty. The biggest factor that led to poverty reduction from 2004-2012 was labor income. The Huffington Post reported that in poor households every Latin American country had an average of 20 percent “fewer human resources to generate income” than non-poor households and those households who managed to escape poverty.

Chronic poverty levels are falling. Between 2000 and 2014, the number of Latin Americans living on under $4 a day decreased from 45 percent to 25 percent. The Latin American population living on $2.5 per day fell from 28 percent to 14 percent.

The falling poverty levels in Latin America can be attributed to improved public policy. Latin American governments created conditional cash transfers (CCT), which substituted subsidies for money transfers for the poor who invested in human capital beginning in the late 1990s. As a result, child attendance in schools has risen and families have more food and more diversity in diets.

 

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View NickinOX's Profile NickinOX Flag Sailing country. 05 Feb 19 8.00pm Send a Private Message to NickinOX Add NickinOX as a friend

Originally posted by Bert the Head

Funny how poverty in other Latin American Countries never equates to a failed political system

10 Facts About Poverty in Latin America
One in five Latin Americans lives in chronic poverty conditions. Latin Americans account for 130 million of the nearly 500 million who live in chronic poverty worldwide.

Poverty rates vary from country to country in the Latin American region. With estimated poverty rates floating around 10 percent, Uruguay, Argentina and Chile have the lowest chronic poverty rates. Meanwhile, Nicaragua with 37 percent and Guatemala with 50 percent have the highest chronic poverty rates in Latin America, which are well above the regional average of 21 percent.

Poverty rates can also vary within a country. A single country can have both ends of the spectrum with the highest poverty rate that is eight times higher than the lowest. For example, Brazil has a chronic poverty rate of 5 percent in Santa Catarina, but 40 percent in Ceará.

Poverty in Latin America encompasses both urban and rural areas. Most assume that rural areas have higher poverty rates than urban areas, like in Bolivia, where the amount of people living in rural poverty is 20 percentage points higher than those living in urban poverty. However, the number of urban poor is higher than the number of rural poor in Chile, Brazil, Mexico, Colombia and the Dominican Republic.

Poor Latin Americans lack access to basic health care services. Approximately 20 percent of the Latin American and Caribbean population lack access to health care due to their poverty conditions. The region also has high rates of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity and cancer.

Those living in poverty in Latin America lack access to safe water and sanitation. The World Water Council reported that 77 million people lack access to safe water or live without a water source in their homes. Of the 77 million, 51 million live in rural areas and 26 million live in urban areas. An estimated 256 million rely on latrines and septic tanks as an alternative to basic sanitation.

The lack of education in Latin America lowers prospects of rising out of poverty. One in 12 young people ages 15 to 24 have not completed primary school, and therefore lack the skills necessary to find decent jobs. The same age group represents 40 percent of the total number of unemployed in many Latin American countries. When they are employed, six out of 10 jobs are informal, lacking decent wages, contract agreements and social security rights.

Limited economic opportunities keep the poor in poverty. The biggest factor that led to poverty reduction from 2004-2012 was labor income. The Huffington Post reported that in poor households every Latin American country had an average of 20 percent “fewer human resources to generate income” than non-poor households and those households who managed to escape poverty.

Chronic poverty levels are falling. Between 2000 and 2014, the number of Latin Americans living on under a day decreased from 45 percent to 25 percent. The Latin American population living on .5 per day fell from 28 percent to 14 percent.

The falling poverty levels in Latin America can be attributed to improved public policy. Latin American governments created conditional cash transfers (CCT), which substituted subsidies for money transfers for the poor who invested in human capital beginning in the late 1990s. As a result, child attendance in schools has risen and families have more food and more diversity in diets.

This bit is key. Pubic policy changed to give ownership and responsibility for self improvement to the individuals. It empowered them, and the free market allowed them to improve their economic and social well being. Throw in the land reforms of many South and Central American countries, so that more ordinary people actually own their own land rather than working on collectively owned land, or land owned by the kelptocrats such as that in Venezuela, and you have another reason why things are improving--albeit slowly.

 


If you come to a fork in the road, take it.

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View Bert the Head's Profile Bert the Head Flag Epsom 05 Feb 19 8.24pm Send a Private Message to Bert the Head Add Bert the Head as a friend

Originally posted by NickinOX

This bit is key. Pubic policy changed to give ownership and responsibility for self improvement to the individuals. It empowered them, and the free market allowed them to improve their economic and social well being. Throw in the land reforms of many South and Central American countries, so that more ordinary people actually own their own land rather than working on collectively owned land, or land owned by the kelptocrats such as that in Venezuela, and you have another reason why things are improving--albeit slowly.

It is more about state and free market helping people along rather than simply "goody" free market and "baddie" state. Also one mans "kelptocrats" is another man's big corporations keeping ownership of land to push values up.

When it comes to Venezuela it is about one thing - they have oil and the US wants it. Guaidó will give it to the US and take his cut.

 

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View Cucking Funt's Profile Cucking Funt Flag The toppermost of the poppermost 05 Feb 19 8.33pm Send a Private Message to Cucking Funt Add Cucking Funt as a friend

Originally posted by Bert the Head

It is more about state and free market helping people along rather than simply "goody" free market and "baddie" state. Also one mans "kelptocrats" is another man's big corporations keeping ownership of land to push values up.

When it comes to Venezuela it is about one thing - they have oil and the US wants it. Guaidó will give it to the US and take his cut.


As opposed to Maduro who wants to keep it all and keep his countrymen in extreme poverty.


 


Wife beating may be socially acceptable in Sheffield, but it is a different matter in Cheltenham

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View .TUX.'s Profile .TUX. Flag 05 Feb 19 8.39pm Send a Private Message to .TUX. Add .TUX. as a friend

It was only a few years ago that Venezuela had the best performing stock market on the planet.

Funny how things can change so quickly.

 


Buy Litecoin.

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View .TUX.'s Profile .TUX. Flag 05 Feb 19 8.41pm Send a Private Message to .TUX. Add .TUX. as a friend

Originally posted by Bert the Head

It is more about state and free market helping people along rather than simply "goody" free market and "baddie" state. Also one mans "kelptocrats" is another man's big corporations keeping ownership of land to push values up.

When it comes to Venezuela it is about one thing - they have oil and the US wants it. Guaidó will give it to the US and take his cut.

They also have gold held in a vault...........but the Bank of England won't give it back to them.

 


Buy Litecoin.

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View chris123's Profile chris123 Flag hove actually 05 Feb 19 8.46pm Send a Private Message to chris123 Add chris123 as a friend

Originally posted by Bert the Head

It is more about state and free market helping people along rather than simply "goody" free market and "baddie" state. Also one mans "kelptocrats" is another man's big corporations keeping ownership of land to push values up.

When it comes to Venezuela it is about one thing - they have oil and the US wants it. Guaidó will give it to the US and take his cut.

I think the main markets are US, India and China. Because it's heavy it takes a lot of refining.

 

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View cryrst's Profile cryrst Flag Chatham 05 Feb 19 9.49pm Send a Private Message to cryrst Add cryrst as a friend

Originally posted by Bert the Head

Funny how poverty in other Latin American Countries never equates to a failed political system

10 Facts About Poverty in Latin America
One in five Latin Americans lives in chronic poverty conditions. Latin Americans account for 130 million of the nearly 500 million who live in chronic poverty worldwide.

Poverty rates vary from country to country in the Latin American region. With estimated poverty rates floating around 10 percent, Uruguay, Argentina and Chile have the lowest chronic poverty rates. Meanwhile, Nicaragua with 37 percent and Guatemala with 50 percent have the highest chronic poverty rates in Latin America, which are well above the regional average of 21 percent.

Poverty rates can also vary within a country. A single country can have both ends of the spectrum with the highest poverty rate that is eight times higher than the lowest. For example, Brazil has a chronic poverty rate of 5 percent in Santa Catarina, but 40 percent in Ceará.

Poverty in Latin America encompasses both urban and rural areas. Most assume that rural areas have higher poverty rates than urban areas, like in Bolivia, where the amount of people living in rural poverty is 20 percentage points higher than those living in urban poverty. However, the number of urban poor is higher than the number of rural poor in Chile, Brazil, Mexico, Colombia and the Dominican Republic.

Poor Latin Americans lack access to basic health care services. Approximately 20 percent of the Latin American and Caribbean population lack access to health care due to their poverty conditions. The region also has high rates of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity and cancer.

Those living in poverty in Latin America lack access to safe water and sanitation. The World Water Council reported that 77 million people lack access to safe water or live without a water source in their homes. Of the 77 million, 51 million live in rural areas and 26 million live in urban areas. An estimated 256 million rely on latrines and septic tanks as an alternative to basic sanitation.

The lack of education in Latin America lowers prospects of rising out of poverty. One in 12 young people ages 15 to 24 have not completed primary school, and therefore lack the skills necessary to find decent jobs. The same age group represents 40 percent of the total number of unemployed in many Latin American countries. When they are employed, six out of 10 jobs are informal, lacking decent wages, contract agreements and social security rights.

Limited economic opportunities keep the poor in poverty. The biggest factor that led to poverty reduction from 2004-2012 was labor income. The Huffington Post reported that in poor households every Latin American country had an average of 20 percent “fewer human resources to generate income” than non-poor households and those households who managed to escape poverty.

Chronic poverty levels are falling. Between 2000 and 2014, the number of Latin Americans living on under a day decreased from 45 percent to 25 percent. The Latin American population living on .5 per day fell from 28 percent to 14 percent.

The falling poverty levels in Latin America can be attributed to improved public policy. Latin American governments created conditional cash transfers (CCT), which substituted subsidies for money transfers for the poor who invested in human capital beginning in the late 1990s. As a result, child attendance in schools has risen and families have more food and more diversity in diets.

Capitalism is what reduces poverty.

 

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View .TUX.'s Profile .TUX. Flag 05 Feb 19 10.29pm Send a Private Message to .TUX. Add .TUX. as a friend

Originally posted by cryrst

Capitalism is what reduces poverty.

Your time is worth less than those you follow.

 


Buy Litecoin.

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View cryrst's Profile cryrst Flag Chatham 05 Feb 19 10.41pm Send a Private Message to cryrst Add cryrst as a friend

Originally posted by .TUX.

Your time is worth less than those you follow.

Ok then show me an example where it hasnt.

 

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