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September 16 2019 3.34pm

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View W12's Profile W12 Flag 01 Jul 19 9.55am Send a Private Message to W12 Add W12 as a friend

Originally posted by Wisbech Eagle

I am not actually in Cornwall right now. I am in the Philippines where for the last 20 years I have spent several months each year. This though is a brief visit. Spending time in a very different culture does though bring it' rewards on how you see your own.

I definitely don't think things are "going to continue as they are"! Everything evolves and changes as a response. The difficulty I have with the arguments that you and others here try to make is that they are not evolutionary at all. They are regressive and seek to return us to a time and to conditions that no longer exist and cannot be recreated.

Globalisation is a fact. It's just part of the tide of history which cannot be resisted. So we must work with it to our advantage or be consumed by it.

Just seeing problems doesn't produce answers. If the answers that are proposed make no sense and are undeliverable populist clap trap then all we do is waste the time we could be better spending swimming with the tide rather than against it.

Our security services see the threats OK. Not just from Islamic fundamentalism but also from far right wing terrorism and the cyber warfare coming from Russia and China. I don't think they have much sympathy for populist movements that seek to take advantage of any of such threats.

Incidentally I spent the last two days with a guy who used to live in New York, has met Trump and had some business dealings with him. More of that at the appropriate time.

Re-branding and normalizing mass 3rd world migration as the inevitability of globalism is shocking. No culture can sustain this without huge conflict being the thing that's inevitable. People in the 3rd world have a far higher level of in group preference and the rate of change and sheer numbers will mean most will never see themselves as citizens of their host countries or part of those countries culture.

 

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View Stirlingsays's Profile Stirlingsays Flag Wisbech, England 01 Jul 19 10.42am Send a Private Message to Stirlingsays Holmesdale Online Elite Member Add Stirlingsays as a friend

Funny how it's the guy with 'globalist' politics who spends time every year in the Philippines. A country that very much rejects his.....imagine my shock.

The Philippines where foreigners can't fully own businesses that cater to the domestic market....at maximum only 40 percent....and then they are expected to employ nationals.

A foreigner can't own a house in their own name and has to be married to someone from the Philippines and a foreigner can't own land full stop.

Funny that.

The Philippines is protecting the long term hegemony of its country so that it stays and benefits its own.

No fear of losing its capital and largest cities to foreign influence there.

These rules are commonplace all over East Asia.

Edited by Stirlingsays (01 Jul 2019 11.12am)

 

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View Wisbech Eagle's Profile Wisbech Eagle Flag Truro Cornwall 01 Jul 19 11.38am Send a Private Message to Wisbech Eagle Add Wisbech Eagle as a friend

Originally posted by W12

Re-branding and normalizing mass 3rd world migration as the inevitability of globalism is shocking. No culture can sustain this without huge conflict being the thing that's inevitable. People in the 3rd world have a far higher level of in group preference and the rate of change and sheer numbers will mean most will never see themselves as citizens of their host countries or part of those countries culture.

The thing that is shocking is the distortion in that comment.

Globalisation and "mass migration" are not the same at all. The first is inevitable whilst the second can be managed to suit the economy of each country.

we need to adjust our economy to benefit from the inevitable whilst keeping a close control over all aspects of migration. It just requires common sense.

 

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View Wisbech Eagle's Profile Wisbech Eagle Flag Truro Cornwall 01 Jul 19 11.41am Send a Private Message to Wisbech Eagle Add Wisbech Eagle as a friend

Duplicate removed.

Edited by Wisbech Eagle (01 Jul 2019 11.49am)

 

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View Wisbech Eagle's Profile Wisbech Eagle Flag Truro Cornwall 01 Jul 19 12.24pm Send a Private Message to Wisbech Eagle Add Wisbech Eagle as a friend

Originally posted by Stirlingsays

Funny how it's the guy with 'globalist' politics who spends time every year in the Philippines. A country that very much rejects his.....imagine my shock.

The Philippines where foreigners can't fully own businesses that cater to the domestic market....at maximum only 40 percent....and then they are expected to employ nationals.

A foreigner can't own a house in their own name and has to be married to someone from the Philippines and a foreigner can't own land full stop.

Funny that.

The Philippines is protecting the long term hegemony of its country so that it stays and benefits its own.

No fear of losing its capital and largest cities to foreign influence there.

These rules are commonplace all over East Asia.

Edited by Stirlingsays (01 Jul 2019 11.12am)

Whilst some of those facts are currently true the interpretation of the reasoning behind them is not. There is almost no comparisons to be made with the situation at home.

It is certainly true that this is a common position in SE Asia the reason for which is rooted in the desire to stop either a Japanese or Chinese takeover of their industries. It is something which has been pushed by the oligarch families who control the economy here, as well as most of politics. No-one fears mass migration, because there isn't enough work here and the flow is all the other way. It has nothing to do with protecting the common man and everything to do with protecting the wealthy. So completely different to the UK.

There are always ways to get around the "rules". A friend of mine here specialises in helping foreign nationals set up in a secure way. Likewise although a foreigner cannot own land he can own buildings and lease the land for 999 years. You just pay the attorneys.

The current government here are aware that the rules are out of date and disincentivise inward investment and have plans to change them but face opposition from the entrenched oligarchs. Not that you would think there was any lack of investment. I was in Cebu yesterday and it's booming.

 

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View Stirlingsays's Profile Stirlingsays Flag Wisbech, England 01 Jul 19 1.28pm Send a Private Message to Stirlingsays Holmesdale Online Elite Member Add Stirlingsays as a friend

Originally posted by Wisbech Eagle

Whilst some of those facts are currently true the interpretation of the reasoning behind them is not. There is almost no comparisons to be made with the situation at home.

It is certainly true that this is a common position in SE Asia the reason for which is rooted in the desire to stop either a Japanese or Chinese takeover of their industries. It is something which has been pushed by the oligarch families who control the economy here, as well as most of politics. No-one fears mass migration, because there isn't enough work here and the flow is all the other way. It has nothing to do with protecting the common man and everything to do with protecting the wealthy. So completely different to the UK.

There are always ways to get around the "rules". A friend of mine here specialises in helping foreign nationals set up in a secure way. Likewise although a foreigner cannot own land he can own buildings and lease the land for 999 years. You just pay the attorneys.

The current government here are aware that the rules are out of date and disincentivise inward investment and have plans to change them but face opposition from the entrenched oligarchs. Not that you would think there was any lack of investment. I was in Cebu yesterday and it's booming.

As usual your interpretation conveniently fits your worldview.....For example, if it were just about the understandable concern over China or Japan, then there would be exceptions for Europeans and Africans would there not?...especially since Europeans have been rather frequent travellers to South East Asia for many decades now.

Yet no exception.

As for me, I'm pretty sure that in twenty years time these rules wouldn't have shifted to any significant level.

A lease is not ownership and can be taken away should the will be there.

Edited by Stirlingsays (01 Jul 2019 1.29pm)

 

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View Wisbech Eagle's Profile Wisbech Eagle Flag Truro Cornwall 01 Jul 19 2.24pm Send a Private Message to Wisbech Eagle Add Wisbech Eagle as a friend

Originally posted by Stirlingsays

As usual your interpretation conveniently fits your worldview.....For example, if it were just about the understandable concern over China or Japan, then there would be exceptions for Europeans and Africans would there not?...especially since Europeans have been rather frequent travellers to South East Asia for many decades now.

Yet no exception.

As for me, I'm pretty sure that in twenty years time these rules wouldn't have shifted to any significant level.

A lease is not ownership and can be taken away should the will be there.

Edited by Stirlingsays (01 Jul 2019 1.29pm)

It has nothing at all to do with my, or any other, "worldview"! It only has to do with history. That there have been several attempts by successive governments to liberalise the regulations suggests that it will be done. The oligarchs are simply afraid of the competition. For instance electricity costs at least double what it does at home because it is almost all generated by private companies using imported coal, in a country with a lot of solar potential and wind in abundance. It's holding the country back and they know it. The rich here just get richer at the expense of the poor. As foreigners are not allowed to make public political statements I could be thrown in jail for saying that in a bar! And you worry about free speech in the UK!

The leases are written on a irrevocable basis. Of course anything can be overturned, even ownership, but it's as secure as it can be in a country where nothing is ever 100% sure.

 

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View Stirlingsays's Profile Stirlingsays Flag Wisbech, England 01 Jul 19 8.06pm Send a Private Message to Stirlingsays Holmesdale Online Elite Member Add Stirlingsays as a friend

Originally posted by Wisbech Eagle

It has nothing at all to do with my, or any other, "worldview"! It only has to do with history. That there have been several attempts by successive governments to liberalise the regulations suggests that it will be done. The oligarchs are simply afraid of the competition. For instance electricity costs at least double what it does at home because it is almost all generated by private companies using imported coal, in a country with a lot of solar potential and wind in abundance. It's holding the country back and they know it. The rich here just get richer at the expense of the poor. As foreigners are not allowed to make public political statements I could be thrown in jail for saying that in a bar! And you worry about free speech in the UK!

The leases are written on a irrevocable basis. Of course anything can be overturned, even ownership, but it's as secure as it can be in a country where nothing is ever 100% sure.


You ignore my main point and just waffle away with 'pie in the sky' and wish fulfillment observations.

Waste of time really.

Edited by Stirlingsays (01 Jul 2019 8.08pm)

 

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View Wisbech Eagle's Profile Wisbech Eagle Flag Truro Cornwall 02 Jul 19 1.59pm Send a Private Message to Wisbech Eagle Add Wisbech Eagle as a friend

Originally posted by Stirlingsays


You ignore my main point and just waffle away with 'pie in the sky' and wish fulfillment observations.

Waste of time really.

Edited by Stirlingsays (01 Jul 2019 8.08pm)

I agree that an exchange of views between someone who has years of direct personal experience to enable the bare facts to be set in their context and someone who has obtained the bare facts from Google but still thinks they know better, is usually a waste of time.

I suppose you think your "main point" was the possibility of exceptions! I answered that by telling you the rules are wrapped up in the country's history, which your Google friend can help you with if you are really interested.

Essentially that concerns the Spanish legacy of the Catholic Church which affects every aspect of life here, including politics. The Church support the oligarchs as they like to keep the masses poor, ignorant, subservient and faithful. The oligarchs support the Church.

Then there is the influence of the USA who dumped the country after the Vietnam War. They think they gained their independence and decided then to restrict the influence of ALL outsiders.

Over the years the more forward thinking politicians have tried to liberalise the rules which they realise hold their country back. Others resist, fearing competition and the unwanted influence of western culture. Like birth control!

The changes are coming though.

This situation is entirety different to that at home. There is no mass inward migration. The flow is all the other way. Globalisation benefits the country as it provides jobs abroad for millions and more at home with internet based call centres and back office functions.

 

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View Stirlingsays's Profile Stirlingsays Flag Wisbech, England 02 Jul 19 2.25pm Send a Private Message to Stirlingsays Holmesdale Online Elite Member Add Stirlingsays as a friend

Originally posted by Wisbech Eagle

I agree that an exchange of views between someone who has years of direct personal experience to enable the bare facts to be set in their context and someone who has obtained the bare facts from Google but still thinks they know better, is usually a waste of time.

I suppose you think your "main point" was the possibility of exceptions! I answered that by telling you the rules are wrapped up in the country's history, which your Google friend can help you with if you are really interested.

Essentially that concerns the Spanish legacy of the Catholic Church which affects every aspect of life here, including politics. The Church support the oligarchs as they like to keep the masses poor, ignorant, subservient and faithful. The oligarchs support the Church.

Then there is the influence of the USA who dumped the country after the Vietnam War. They think they gained their independence and decided then to restrict the influence of ALL outsiders.

Over the years the more forward thinking politicians have tried to liberalise the rules which they realise hold their country back. Others resist, fearing competition and the unwanted influence of western culture. Like birth control!

The changes are coming though.

This situation is entirety different to that at home. There is no mass inward migration. The flow is all the other way. Globalisation benefits the country as it provides jobs abroad for millions and more at home with internet based call centres and back office functions.

Your first paragraph brings into sharp relief how disingenuous your claims were earlier in the thread about playing the ball and not the man.

Not that It bothers me, as I freely criticise you....what bothers me is just how false and disingenuous you are.

Your views are comic, just not amusing.....and you will continue to be directly criticised until you honour the request to stop directly replying to me.

Your answer still misses the main point that I answered. To quote you: 'It is certainly true that this is a common position in SE Asia the reason for which is rooted in the desire to stop either a Japanese or Chinese takeover of their industries. It is something which has been pushed by the oligarch families who control the economy here'.

I pointed out that the ban on foreign ownership includes people like you....a 'European'. If it were just the fear of select nationalities that would be reflected legally.

Then your answer pretends that in a voting democracy that a few powerful families essentially keep the rules in place and that people are too stupid or ignorant to want what you want......pure simplistic nonsense.

I on the other hand....I fully support those in the Philippines that look at exploiters like you and other globalists and reject them.

You are good for nothing but money and your influence should be restricted only to money.

Otherwise their culture and their control of industries and business is gone....admittedly the latter before the former, but it would still happen without controls that restrict foreign control.

They and many SE Asian countries....from the already rich to the poor all understand and their laws reflect it.....Just as a richer country like Japan keeps people like you out and keeps them second class citizens, so does the Philippines, Vietnam and others.

Edited by Stirlingsays (02 Jul 2019 2.36pm)

 

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View Wisbech Eagle's Profile Wisbech Eagle Flag Truro Cornwall 03 Jul 19 3.20am Send a Private Message to Wisbech Eagle Add Wisbech Eagle as a friend

Originally posted by Stirlingsays

Your answer still misses the main point that I answered. To quote you: 'It is certainly true that this is a common position in SE Asia the reason for which is rooted in the desire to stop either a Japanese or Chinese takeover of their industries. It is something which has been pushed by the oligarch families who control the economy here'.

I pointed out that the ban on foreign ownership includes people like you....a 'European'. If it were just the fear of select nationalities that would be reflected legally.

And I responded by pointing out that the reason is historical and went on to explain part of that history, which you totally ignore. Whilst the major fear was initially of the Japanese, given their WW2 experience, they produced a total ban in response to the desire to establish their independence. I was not involved at that time but don't think there was much thought given to exceptions because no one was wanting to invest back then. Maybe the first steps towards liberalisation will be some exceptions, although I suspect the Japanese and Chinese would object.

Then your answer pretends that in a voting democracy that a few powerful families essentially keep the rules in place and that people are too stupid or ignorant to want what you want......pure simplistic nonsense.

That just shows how ignorant of the actual situation here you really are. This is a democracy such as you have never experienced. Votes are bought and sold here. People seek office to gain access to the bribery opportunities. The Church tells people how to vote and they do it. Not all, of course, but enough. The current President, despite his faults, is bravely tackling the corruption and Church power, with some success. Change is in air.

I on the other hand....I fully support those in the Philippines that look at exploiters like you and other globalists and reject them.

Why and how you think I have exploited this country beats me. I have spent a lot of money here, probably in excess of 500,000, in the last 15 years, building 3 houses for local families to live in, funded several small businesses and fed many poor people. I have taken nothing at all in return. Some exploitation!

As I have told you many times globalisation is an inevitable consequence of human and industrial evolution, of which this country is a good example. We also need to learn to exploit it because you cannot turn back time. The Internet is not going to be disinvented.

You are good for nothing but money and your influence should be restricted only to money.

There are many here who would disagree and tell you that they have also benefited from my experience.

Otherwise their culture and their control of industries and business is gone....admittedly the latter before the former, but it would still happen without controls that restrict foreign control.

Some of their culture needs to go! The widespread availability, and use, of guns, the huge drug problem and the endemic corruption as examples. I would personally add the corrosive influence of the Catholic Church which, although in relative decline, retain huge power here. Those who return here after living abroad realise all that and argue for change. There is no need to fear foreign control. It can be regulated and managed. Allowing competition is all that is needed. Permitting local monopolies over things like power generation is not in the people's interests.

They and many SE Asian countries....from the already rich to the poor all understand and their laws reflect it.....Just as a richer country like Japan keeps people like you out and keeps them second class citizens, so does the Philippines, Vietnam and others.

As I have no direct experience of any other SE Asian countries, or Japan, I won't presume to be able to comment. Unlike you! I just know here, and here there is the sense of change in the air.

Edited by Stirlingsays (02 Jul 2019 2.36pm)

 

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